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Real women with real tits. Teen soccer girl models naked. Nude pregnant pussy self shot. Friendsgiving activities. Sexy nymphos in Hungary. Brazilian Hooker Anal. Images Of Bikini. Nude pics of big breasted women. Arthur bite plotnik spunk. Video e movies anal kamilla18. If you obsess over every grammatical and structural point, you can come across as stiff. You make one mistake and a lot of people will let it go. Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? has covered grammar nicely here and here and here. But I, as a newcomer to these parts, have a few more peeves to add to the pot. Ignore them at your peril, Bubbles. This is one that Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? make because they think that complicating the Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? needlessly will make them sound smart. This is extremely common, and I can almost forgive it because the correct structure is cumbersome. A good compromise is to pick a gender and run with it. The standard used to be to assume any unknown person read article a man e. This tends to make things more obvious. But you should also fix it. Now, think about that for a second. Seriously, trust me on this one. What, have you forgotten already? Best sexy porn pics Prostitute in Trinidad and Tobago.

Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

Sex Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? full movie. Are you the type that likes to leave work at work? Then teaching is probably not for you. Don't think summers off are all fun and relaxation either, usually teachers work a second job while preparing for the upcoming school year, many need to gain further education to renew their Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? and do so at their own expense.

How do you feel about regimenting your life? Are you ok with being on a strict schedule before and after the work day? Are you an organized person? As a teacher, your job comes first and the day is very regimented. You are constantly in a cycle of writing lessons, teaching lessons, and grading assessments among many other various tasks. To do more info that is demanded it requires teachers to be very organized in their Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

and after work activities.

Porn look Watch Video Sex facebooka. Worry about fluency. And if you already have it, then stop worrying about language and get on with it. Laroquod said at 6: Well, yes. But that means that 10 percent of your readers stop mid-sentence to think: He split an infinitive. To me, writing should be invisible. I am trying to communicate a very specific message, and anything that undermines my communication is defeating my object. So I try to avoid them. Just as I try to avoid showing off in a way that might impress and so interrupt the flow of another 10 percent. Of course, none of this works for a readership that comprises professional writers, because everyone in that group will scrutinize every word. No, Marc. I should have said that I recommend that good writers—like good chefs—should focus on their goals to turn on readers or diners rather than to show off too obviously their technical skills. Wow, you literally cut poeple up — including myself — chewed them, and and then spat them out! Truth is, I hate the man or woman who makes these mistakes, too. Are they an hillbilly or something? Just so everyone knows, this post has made me paranoid. See how flexible I am? It just drives me crazy literally! Chimps abound, apparently. Could it concern something other than simply just ignorance? That it shows up in writing demonstrates the way in which grammar is shaped. Oh Johnny… you had me. I was literally ha going to start telling all that would listen about your brilliance, your beauty surely all grammar snobs are beautiful , your… hmmm, what is the word? Your rightness. And then, much to my chagrin, you committed one of my own pet peeves in comment You cannot come up with a better choice of words? Just tell me that you spontaneously developed a 23rd chromosome and all will be right in the world. Would you like another example: Wait, wait, wait. Hold on. Sarah Turner I write both in French and in English, and, like Johnny B. There are writers who are as dangerous as bad drivers. But there is another side to that coin. I try to write as well as I know how. Which may be why I never try to humiliate anyone else when they do. The chances of my ever successfully constructing a bookcase are minimal. The chances of my ever returning a tennis serve are similar. Pointing and laughing are bad ways to foster talent. Those who are interested in writing will quickly discover the basic rules, and will — like the rest of us — embark on a lifetime of learning. Great post, One really easy tip to add to them is this: Make sure you check a post or comment before hitting the send button. I think we can finally consider that a correct meaning. Meanings change. But after a while even the most pedantic just have to let go. And I think nearly three centuries is long enough. You are not crazy. It sounds better. That is all it takes — how does it sound best. Of course, the words have to be pronounced correctly, something most Americans seem incapable of. This is how you would manage to read a history book to learn about an historical event, and be correct. It is a rather outdated rule that continues to change over time as we continue to pronounce things differently. Language shifts, but at this point in time, it is still acceptable. People will get angry at you for it, but people will always be there to defend you for it as well because technically both are correct. Give it another couple of decades, and it may be gone forever. Do you think this is an example of language constantly changing, which I suppose could reasonably be claimed given the number of times I hear it in a week? Or are they getting it wrong and therefore should be corrected? However, they are the source of language change and, when adopted by enough people especially people with power they are considered legitimate language changes. Can you tell me where this is? Should you correct them? At the very least, they should know the more standard meaning of the word lend. People should have access to that so that they can be best understood by others outside their immediate social groups, and also so that they have more opportunities for social advancement. But explain to them, too, that in school it has a different meaning and you want them to use that meaning for practice. Of course, whether your correcting has much effect is another matter entirely. Peers have more influence on our speech than teachers or even parents. Alistair Keep up the good work and continue correcting. I recently came to the conclusion that language is an evolving thing but there are some words, quite a lot of them, that are exempt from this theory. I agree, Christine. And that really makes me sad. Cassie How funny. A very good friend of mine, an English teacher, used to tell me that there was no such thing as correct spelling, for precisely the same reason — that language is constantly evolving. I told him this is completely ridiculous. I have also been told that as a Science teacher, I should ignore misspellings and grammatical errors as we should be focusing solely on the Science. However, my argument is that being able to communicate effectively is part of being a scientist, and if pupils are unable to do that then they are not being good scientists. The British Government had a great idea in the 60s; they decided the best way of teaching English was to encourage pupils to write phonetically. Unfortunately, it was much more difficult to read because of all of the possible phonetic variations and led, ultimately, to a generation that struggled — and still struggles — with literacy. However, we have to aim to uphold the standards so that people can communicate effectively. By the way, I have a feeling that the reference to chimps was probably made in humour and not intended to cause offence. They may sound very different to you, but to a complete outsider there will probably be far more similarities than differences. The fact that it is that widespread actually points to there being more going on than just a few ignorant kids. Where are they getting it from? Other than being young, are there any other similarities between the kids socially? Are they of a similar social class, for example? In addition to the geographical variation that we call dialects, there are also sociolects, language varieties among certain social groups which can be defined not just by social class, but also gender, age, ethnicity, even attitudes, etc. The two are not mutually exclusive. By the way, I agree with you about teaching proper spelling — at least as much as it can be taught. Knowing standardized spelling makes it not only easier to be understood, it also makes it easier to recognize words quickly when reading. Again, it is not necessary that the students always spell correctly. It kills me much more than the five listed here. Another case of people trying to sound intelligent. Very interesting grammar read, expecially for me as a learner of the English language. Which word sounds correct in that sentence? Then you just add Bob and Mr. Parsons back into the sentence: Parsons, and me. You can check my comment above for more detail, or click here: Some would argue that it is correct if we hear it on the CBC. I just re-read my own blog entry and found a spelling error. Spell checkers have become my crutch. The CBC is certainly not an authority. In addition to some of their usage, there is the matter of how they pronounce many words. I must admit, however, that they do pay attention even if it takes many years. Best regards from another Anton! I just love it when a favourite maverick shows his anal side! When a person is slated with selecting the committee, then including oneself in the committee is a reflexive act. The sentence: The speaker is just an object put in the committee with the other objects. Awesome Article …. Dear friend some times mistakes becomes so common that become part of writing. I ask him: He responds: I think both are okay. Thank you. Skip to primary navigation Skip to content Skip to primary sidebar. Writing can be really no-win. For example: Was vs. Get Grammarly. Previous article: Landing Page Makeover Clinic Next article: Finding Your Village of Customers. Reader Comments Another great piece Johnny. The error that irks me the most is: Where do people pick this up? Do high-school English teachers allow it? The two errors that bother me the most: Blake Waddill. The committee will consist of Bob, Mr Parsons and I. Okay, nobody has yet 1. Called me an elitist butthole for nitpicking these things. I really have to stop monitoring this thread…. Would you say: I like the mall Santa story. So take your example: Ah, and the axiom proves true yet again: Anyone want to fight to the death over this one? I say the following is wrong: Sean — One of my favorites, but CB has already done that one. Interestingly, I was reading the blogs of several noted professional copyeditors earlier this week, and two items struck me: Drew — oops. Go, Be, yup. My bad, busted. Change the list to sandwiches: RE point 1: Just curious! Good article btw. Awesome article… It drives me crazy to see bad grammar in blogs — I know I do it too, but it still drives me nuts! Johnny B! Marc — One word: WTF is that stuff? Ground artichokes and bone meal? I totally abuse the ellipsis… The reason I use it so much is: Anyone got any tips on appropriate use or non-use of these various devices? Also, no last serial comma. Thanks for the help! Grammar FTW! I and me. You might consider doing the same. Anon, You might consider not being an annoying spoilsport. Good article. My grandmother was a grammar teacher so. Awesome post. Always good stuff coming from you. Forget it. Their examples, with which I agree completely, are: At the bar, two strippers were all over Jim and I. Two strippers were all over Jim and Me. Grammar Posts seem to get folks revved up; you might as well write about religion or politics. That said…. Not least because nearly all of us are chimps at least some of the time. And if one values grace, this sentence: Further, it forces the writer to conflate two meanings that are distinct: I literally thought this article was great! Great post, but one nitpick: Hey Johnny, Great post, and a very good read too. Look it up. Meg she who hath no website said: Bonzo agree. Bonzo like bananas, consequence-free sex, and literal nit-picking. Sorry, I swore earlier I was staying out of this comment thread. I need help. I had a rant about some aspects of this topic myself just last week. The growth and development of language give great pleasures to its lovers. Sigh — I must be getting old. I sound like my English teacher from 40 years ago! That one could get epic. Michelle, I was not looking for typos in this article. Wow, this post sure generated a lot of comments! Now, I literally feel much better. I am going to challenge you on 4. If I were a cat, I would nap all day. Here is a great blog post that explains it better than me: Johnny I just did a little research, which I should have done before asking my question! Some of these invented pronouns are: You get the idea, we could go on and on in making these things up, and many have! Perhaps we should really have a post: This post has added much dork-laden glee to my otherwise dull day. Hi Johnny, Well, I must admit I am a little nervous to leave a comment that will be full of bad grammar and punctuation. I LOVE this post! Sorry for the all caps. What this post disregards is the evolutionary nature of language. Take it there, bring it here. This is a clear case of how the English language is being butchered by Americanisation. Well, practically impossible, anyway. What a sizzling debate. Write like you talk—only better. As many bloggers know, conversational writing is easy, effective and engaging. So seriously, nobody remembers Lancelot Link, Secret Chimp? Some examples: So, perhaps some caveats are in order when making posts such as this? Wonderful post, J! Also, comment addict that he is, I think he may have in fact perished of happiness. Thank you Peter. Great blog, interesting content…. Great post, Johnny. Does anyone remember being told not to use a colon after a verb? Incorrect- My favorite foods are: So, how is my colon LOL in my last post? Do I need a colon: I will join you in strangling anyone who does this. They deserve nothing less. Get me on Twitter so I can respond — johnnybtruant. Absolutely wonderful post! We are not amused… From the Oxford English Dictionary: But this does: Johnny, my host broke my email. Following you now on Twitter. They deserve the magic of a captivating story. English teachers look on helplessly as more and more works of fiction are plucked from the curriculum and replaced by fact-driven nonfiction. Even though we're sometimes invited to join curriculum committees as I did under the guise that we might have a say, it's ultimately just a ruse: But here's the thing: Our beloved works of fiction aren't just getting elbowed aside by facts and figures. They're also being trounced by the frenetic crush of technology. There's an app -- er, a reason -- for that. This one is tricky. But I might argue that our job is also to challenge our students with something new -- and, to this generation, technology is not new. In fact, it is all they know. Our kids don't need more of it -- most of them have been swiping and zooming and smartphone-ing since they were toddlers -- and they continue to do it right in the middle of your probably fact-driven lecture about some probably nonfiction book, by the way. It's incredibly frustrating when all that glorious innovation serves as more of a distraction than a learning tool. Though we teachers tend to stick together, I also have a group of friends and family with a wide range of careers -- they run the gamut from successful marketers to mechanical engineers to human resource managers. All of them have interviewed prospective employees for over a decade, and all of them now have a similar complaint: The three C's people suddenly seem to be missing? Curiosity, creativity, and communication skills. Technology is wonderful -- nay, necessary -- for a plethora of things, but it's killing those beautiful C's. And as a teacher, you don't just witness the death, you are expected to assist in the murder. Because of standardized expectations, you must incorporate more and more tech, even when all you want to do is take a hammer to anything with a screen. The air inside your classroom walls is probably thick with the stench of "It's not my fault, it's your fault," and it sure seems like the smell is coming from the students. Like cigarette smoke, it gets carried in from home, rising from their backpacks, woven through the threads of their clothes and the fibers of their upbringing. Their whole lives, generations of special snowflakes have received copious awards and accolades just for playing -- NOT for excelling -- so it's no wonder kids have come to expect an A "because I tried. It means that Johnny might have actually earned a D this time. It means he might not have written a perfect paper. Brace yourself for the irate phone call in the morning. Of course, for every helicopter parent, there is a devastatingly absentee parent, as well as an equal number who are so remarkably supportive that you wonder if they're even real. They are warm and generous and responsible. I became a mother a few years ago, and I must shamefully admit I get it now. My children ARE special. My children DO try. I do not EVER want them to feel like they are anything less than the most important people in the world. When my daughter's preschool note tells me she was not a good listener that day, I feel frustrated and helpless and a little bit sure the teacher is just being too demanding. When she ran her first Toddler Turkey Trot last November, the people in charge asked if I wanted to buy her a medal. But as a teacher, this is what you wish you could say: Stop making excuses for your kids. Teach them to earn things, not demand things. Hold them to a higher standard. Challenge them. That way, when I try to challenge them, they'll know we both expect it. Left to their own devices, the kids will be the first to tell you: Yeah, I totally forgot about that assignment. I didn't really try my best. I just didn't feel like finishing the reading. Whoops -- sorry, Ms. They'll cringe at you with raised eyebrows and endearing self-awareness. They'll laugh uproariously when you pull a pretend trophy from your desk and give it a quick shine as soon as they catch themselves in the act of whining. They know. Deep down, despite that wafting air of entitlement, they know exactly what's going on. They are smarter than that, and they are capable of more failures -- and consequently, more successes -- than the world is allowing them to experience. In order for people to really know how well you're doing your job, they have to watch you do it. But when there is only one administrator for every thirty-plus teachers, adequate observation time is often a physical impossibility. Even if an administrator's ONLY JOB was to sit in classroom after classroom, there would still be too few hours in the day, so lawmakers and district higher-ups are scrambling to figure out a way to fill in the blanks. A popular bright idea is to examine students' test scores. In theory, this should work -- but in practice, you've got to be kidding. Students are not products tumbling off a cookie-cutter assembly line. They are human beings , and there are thirty-five of them per class period, and they are influenced by FAR more than yesterday's vocabulary lesson. You are not in charge of how well they slept, or the breakup that happened last week, or if their family has enough money for breakfast -- but all of those things affect test scores. If you don't have a genuine passion for the subject then you will fail to convey that passion to students and they will fail to see its importance to their lives. If you are a real science nerd then what makes you so passionate about it and WHY is it so important that future generations know this stuff? Is working with kids and talking about a subject you like all day worth four years of university study and tuition , long hours of tedious work, low pay, and little recognition to you? You have to really care about education, there are very few teachers out there in which, to them, teaching is just a job. That's because the level of commitment the job requires goes beyond most typical jobs. Teaching is more of a lifestyle where personal sacrifice is an understood norm. Are you the type that likes to leave work at work? Then teaching is probably not for you. Don't think summers off are all fun and relaxation either, usually teachers work a second job while preparing for the upcoming school year, many need to gain further education to renew their license and do so at their own expense. How do you feel about regimenting your life? Are you ok with being on a strict schedule before and after the work day? Are you an organized person? As a teacher, your job comes first and the day is very regimented. You are constantly in a cycle of writing lessons, teaching lessons, and grading assessments among many other various tasks. To do all that is demanded it requires teachers to be very organized in their before and after work activities. Time management is one of the most important skills any good teacher has and if you tend to be a procrastinator you will get buried. Also some people are not cut out for a very regimented work day. This isn't corporate America where you may get an hour for lunch with breaks throughout the day. You have thirty minutes for lunch which many teachers work through to get more work done. Remember it is your responsibility to keep track of about kids, not just their grades but many times what is going on in their lives that could affect them. If you sometimes think "I can barely keep track of my own life" then you may need to work on your organization skills if you are to become a teacher. Can you accept being around kids that have significant disadvantages in life, mentally, emotionally, or socioeconomically and know there is almost nothing you can really do to help them? If you become a teacher, you must know that a large percentage of kids that come through your class will have serious disadvantages in life. Poverty is perhaps the number one factor that plays into how students perform academically. Many students have some type of major life obstacle such as abusive families, poverty, diseases, emotional disabilities, learning disabilities the list is literally endless. Can you accept these problems and realize there is very little you can do about it? Can you take the emotional stress that goes with working with these kids day in and day out for years? Many times you will have to balance your expectations with what is realistically possible for them based on their life situations. Consider this heavily before jumping into the profession with both feet..

Time management is one of the most important skills any good teacher has and if you tend to be a procrastinator you will get buried. Also some people are not cut out for a very regimented work day. This isn't corporate America where you may get an hour for lunch with breaks throughout the day. You have thirty minutes for lunch which many teachers work Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

to get more work done. Remember it is your responsibility to keep track of about kids, not just their grades but many times what is going on in their lives that could affect them.

If you sometimes think "I can Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? keep track of my own life" then you may need to work on your organization skills if you are to become a teacher.

Milf fuck Watch Video Xxx Danmark. Thanks for this post, John! Very interesting article! Many people with native language different than english do common sense errors in their blogs instead promoting clean and crisp language…. There is literally a blog that tracks literally: This was driving me crazy the other day. Every source I checked seemed to have a different opinion. The sentence would still make sense without it and could be moved: Fly, be free. Worry about fluency. And if you already have it, then stop worrying about language and get on with it. Laroquod said at 6: Well, yes. But that means that 10 percent of your readers stop mid-sentence to think: He split an infinitive. To me, writing should be invisible. I am trying to communicate a very specific message, and anything that undermines my communication is defeating my object. So I try to avoid them. Just as I try to avoid showing off in a way that might impress and so interrupt the flow of another 10 percent. Of course, none of this works for a readership that comprises professional writers, because everyone in that group will scrutinize every word. No, Marc. I should have said that I recommend that good writers—like good chefs—should focus on their goals to turn on readers or diners rather than to show off too obviously their technical skills. Wow, you literally cut poeple up — including myself — chewed them, and and then spat them out! Truth is, I hate the man or woman who makes these mistakes, too. Are they an hillbilly or something? Just so everyone knows, this post has made me paranoid. See how flexible I am? It just drives me crazy literally! Chimps abound, apparently. Could it concern something other than simply just ignorance? That it shows up in writing demonstrates the way in which grammar is shaped. Oh Johnny… you had me. I was literally ha going to start telling all that would listen about your brilliance, your beauty surely all grammar snobs are beautiful , your… hmmm, what is the word? Your rightness. And then, much to my chagrin, you committed one of my own pet peeves in comment You cannot come up with a better choice of words? Just tell me that you spontaneously developed a 23rd chromosome and all will be right in the world. Would you like another example: Wait, wait, wait. Hold on. Sarah Turner I write both in French and in English, and, like Johnny B. There are writers who are as dangerous as bad drivers. But there is another side to that coin. I try to write as well as I know how. Which may be why I never try to humiliate anyone else when they do. The chances of my ever successfully constructing a bookcase are minimal. The chances of my ever returning a tennis serve are similar. Pointing and laughing are bad ways to foster talent. Those who are interested in writing will quickly discover the basic rules, and will — like the rest of us — embark on a lifetime of learning. Great post, One really easy tip to add to them is this: Make sure you check a post or comment before hitting the send button. I think we can finally consider that a correct meaning. Meanings change. But after a while even the most pedantic just have to let go. And I think nearly three centuries is long enough. You are not crazy. It sounds better. That is all it takes — how does it sound best. Of course, the words have to be pronounced correctly, something most Americans seem incapable of. This is how you would manage to read a history book to learn about an historical event, and be correct. It is a rather outdated rule that continues to change over time as we continue to pronounce things differently. Language shifts, but at this point in time, it is still acceptable. People will get angry at you for it, but people will always be there to defend you for it as well because technically both are correct. Give it another couple of decades, and it may be gone forever. Do you think this is an example of language constantly changing, which I suppose could reasonably be claimed given the number of times I hear it in a week? Or are they getting it wrong and therefore should be corrected? However, they are the source of language change and, when adopted by enough people especially people with power they are considered legitimate language changes. Can you tell me where this is? Should you correct them? At the very least, they should know the more standard meaning of the word lend. People should have access to that so that they can be best understood by others outside their immediate social groups, and also so that they have more opportunities for social advancement. But explain to them, too, that in school it has a different meaning and you want them to use that meaning for practice. Of course, whether your correcting has much effect is another matter entirely. Peers have more influence on our speech than teachers or even parents. Alistair Keep up the good work and continue correcting. I recently came to the conclusion that language is an evolving thing but there are some words, quite a lot of them, that are exempt from this theory. I agree, Christine. And that really makes me sad. Cassie How funny. A very good friend of mine, an English teacher, used to tell me that there was no such thing as correct spelling, for precisely the same reason — that language is constantly evolving. I told him this is completely ridiculous. I have also been told that as a Science teacher, I should ignore misspellings and grammatical errors as we should be focusing solely on the Science. However, my argument is that being able to communicate effectively is part of being a scientist, and if pupils are unable to do that then they are not being good scientists. The British Government had a great idea in the 60s; they decided the best way of teaching English was to encourage pupils to write phonetically. Unfortunately, it was much more difficult to read because of all of the possible phonetic variations and led, ultimately, to a generation that struggled — and still struggles — with literacy. However, we have to aim to uphold the standards so that people can communicate effectively. By the way, I have a feeling that the reference to chimps was probably made in humour and not intended to cause offence. They may sound very different to you, but to a complete outsider there will probably be far more similarities than differences. The fact that it is that widespread actually points to there being more going on than just a few ignorant kids. Where are they getting it from? Other than being young, are there any other similarities between the kids socially? Are they of a similar social class, for example? In addition to the geographical variation that we call dialects, there are also sociolects, language varieties among certain social groups which can be defined not just by social class, but also gender, age, ethnicity, even attitudes, etc. The two are not mutually exclusive. By the way, I agree with you about teaching proper spelling — at least as much as it can be taught. Knowing standardized spelling makes it not only easier to be understood, it also makes it easier to recognize words quickly when reading. Again, it is not necessary that the students always spell correctly. It kills me much more than the five listed here. Another case of people trying to sound intelligent. Very interesting grammar read, expecially for me as a learner of the English language. Which word sounds correct in that sentence? Then you just add Bob and Mr. Parsons back into the sentence: Parsons, and me. You can check my comment above for more detail, or click here: Some would argue that it is correct if we hear it on the CBC. I just re-read my own blog entry and found a spelling error. Spell checkers have become my crutch. The CBC is certainly not an authority. In addition to some of their usage, there is the matter of how they pronounce many words. I must admit, however, that they do pay attention even if it takes many years. Best regards from another Anton! I just love it when a favourite maverick shows his anal side! When a person is slated with selecting the committee, then including oneself in the committee is a reflexive act. The sentence: The speaker is just an object put in the committee with the other objects. Awesome Article …. Dear friend some times mistakes becomes so common that become part of writing. I ask him: He responds: I think both are okay. Thank you. Skip to primary navigation Skip to content Skip to primary sidebar. Writing can be really no-win. For example: Was vs. Get Grammarly. Previous article: Landing Page Makeover Clinic Next article: Finding Your Village of Customers. Reader Comments Another great piece Johnny. The error that irks me the most is: Where do people pick this up? Do high-school English teachers allow it? The two errors that bother me the most: Blake Waddill. The committee will consist of Bob, Mr Parsons and I. Okay, nobody has yet 1. Called me an elitist butthole for nitpicking these things. I really have to stop monitoring this thread…. Would you say: I like the mall Santa story. So take your example: Ah, and the axiom proves true yet again: Anyone want to fight to the death over this one? I say the following is wrong: Sean — One of my favorites, but CB has already done that one. Interestingly, I was reading the blogs of several noted professional copyeditors earlier this week, and two items struck me: Drew — oops. Go, Be, yup. My bad, busted. Change the list to sandwiches: RE point 1: Just curious! Good article btw. Awesome article… It drives me crazy to see bad grammar in blogs — I know I do it too, but it still drives me nuts! Johnny B! Marc — One word: WTF is that stuff? Ground artichokes and bone meal? I totally abuse the ellipsis… The reason I use it so much is: Anyone got any tips on appropriate use or non-use of these various devices? Also, no last serial comma. Thanks for the help! Grammar FTW! I and me. You might consider doing the same. Anon, You might consider not being an annoying spoilsport. Good article. My grandmother was a grammar teacher so. Awesome post. Always good stuff coming from you. Forget it. Their examples, with which I agree completely, are: At the bar, two strippers were all over Jim and I. Two strippers were all over Jim and Me. Grammar Posts seem to get folks revved up; you might as well write about religion or politics. That said…. Not least because nearly all of us are chimps at least some of the time. And if one values grace, this sentence: Further, it forces the writer to conflate two meanings that are distinct: I literally thought this article was great! Great post, but one nitpick: Hey Johnny, Great post, and a very good read too. Look it up. Meg she who hath no website said: Bonzo agree. Bonzo like bananas, consequence-free sex, and literal nit-picking. Sorry, I swore earlier I was staying out of this comment thread. I need help. I had a rant about some aspects of this topic myself just last week. The growth and development of language give great pleasures to its lovers. Sigh — I must be getting old. I sound like my English teacher from 40 years ago! That one could get epic. Michelle, I was not looking for typos in this article. Wow, this post sure generated a lot of comments! Now, I literally feel much better. I am going to challenge you on 4. If I were a cat, I would nap all day. Here is a great blog post that explains it better than me: Johnny I just did a little research, which I should have done before asking my question! Some of these invented pronouns are: You get the idea, we could go on and on in making these things up, and many have! Perhaps we should really have a post: This post has added much dork-laden glee to my otherwise dull day. Hi Johnny, Well, I must admit I am a little nervous to leave a comment that will be full of bad grammar and punctuation. I LOVE this post! Sorry for the all caps. What this post disregards is the evolutionary nature of language. Take it there, bring it here. This is a clear case of how the English language is being butchered by Americanisation. Well, practically impossible, anyway. What a sizzling debate. Write like you talk—only better. As many bloggers know, conversational writing is easy, effective and engaging. So seriously, nobody remembers Lancelot Link, Secret Chimp? Some examples: So, perhaps some caveats are in order when making posts such as this? Wonderful post, J! Also, comment addict that he is, I think he may have in fact perished of happiness. Thank you Peter. Great blog, interesting content…. Great post, Johnny. Does anyone remember being told not to use a colon after a verb? Incorrect- My favorite foods are: So, how is my colon LOL in my last post? Do I need a colon: I just didn't feel like finishing the reading. Whoops -- sorry, Ms. They'll cringe at you with raised eyebrows and endearing self-awareness. They'll laugh uproariously when you pull a pretend trophy from your desk and give it a quick shine as soon as they catch themselves in the act of whining. They know. Deep down, despite that wafting air of entitlement, they know exactly what's going on. They are smarter than that, and they are capable of more failures -- and consequently, more successes -- than the world is allowing them to experience. In order for people to really know how well you're doing your job, they have to watch you do it. But when there is only one administrator for every thirty-plus teachers, adequate observation time is often a physical impossibility. Even if an administrator's ONLY JOB was to sit in classroom after classroom, there would still be too few hours in the day, so lawmakers and district higher-ups are scrambling to figure out a way to fill in the blanks. A popular bright idea is to examine students' test scores. In theory, this should work -- but in practice, you've got to be kidding. Students are not products tumbling off a cookie-cutter assembly line. They are human beings , and there are thirty-five of them per class period, and they are influenced by FAR more than yesterday's vocabulary lesson. You are not in charge of how well they slept, or the breakup that happened last week, or if their family has enough money for breakfast -- but all of those things affect test scores. So do IEPs, plans, and whether or not you are teaching an AP or Honors class filled with students who might perform well with or without your help. As more and more districts begin to adopt this nonsensical practice, who will teach the kids who are struggling? Some of the very best teachers do that now, with only intrinsic motivation working to retain them. Another method is to place the burden of proof upon the teacher. Instead of spending your prep hour -- or your Sunday night -- creating a brilliant lesson plan or grading the ten dozen essays you just collected, you must spend that time figuring out how to meet arbitrary goals and initiatives that will become irrelevant and obsolete by the following school year. After that, you must waste utilize class time implementing said goals and initiatives, and then you must spend more prep time and Sunday nights writing reports to prove how well you implemented them. That, combined with your students' test scores, shall determine whether or not you are an effective educator. Can I please just talk about Of Mice and Men instead? Can we spend that time learning why some words on a page just made us cry a little bit? That's the important stuff. That's what matters. Those are the things that teach us who we are. Here are the other things that matter: Helping a group of students work through a disagreement civilly. Keeping everyone calm when someone vomits on the floor. Watching the shyest student in your class, the one who never ever spoke back in September, volunteer to read a part in The Crucible -- and he's hilarious, and he does it with an accent , and he makes two new friends because he finally let himself be vulnerable. Your job is so much more than test scores, meaningless goals, and cyclical initiatives. It is tying shoelaces and distributing Band-Aids. It is listening to a parent cry about her crumbling marriage. It is showing teenagers how to debate thoughtfully, how to think critically, how to disagree respectfully. It is hearing from students ten years after graduation, because they just thought you should know it was your Spanish class that made them want to study abroad, your passion for science that led to a major in biochemistry, your quiet encouragement during their dark days that convinced them to keep coming to school in the first place. Where does that fall on the "highly effective" checklist? How can you document that kind of delayed impact? It certainly can't be measured by A's and E's, or even by weekly walk-throughs. It's no wonder you're getting frustrated. But if these are the reasons you might leave, here is the reason you might stay: The kids. After a year without them, you might miss their unbridled school spirit during Homecoming Week, their contagious sense of humor, the way they draw pictures for you and wave joyous hellos in the hallways. You might miss their ability to make you forget about the rough start to your morning, or the looks of awe on their captivated faces when they finally learn something that matters. If it weren't for them, instead of Googling "I don't want to teach anymore," you might already be gone. A version of this post first appeared on Michifornia Girl. Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. Teacher with papers. To acknowledge the occasion, let me share with you the top search -- BY FAR -- that brings people to my site: I don't want to teach anymore. You are an "authority figure" with no real authority. Reality check: Your day does not resemble that of a typical white-collar professional. Here are the things your friends can do at work: Because you know what else is the boss of you? The bell schedule. Everyone thinks they know how to do your job. This culture shock sometimes sends them running out of the teaching profession. If you have no experiences working with kids at all but just "feel" like you would enjoy it, here is my suggestion. Volunteer to tutor somewhere, monitor how you feel while doing it. If you skip this step you will have NO basis to answer this question and it is perhaps the most fundamental question you need to answer. This is tough to answer because we all like to think we are dependable and we get things done. This is where you need to be truly honest with yourself, are you the person that your friends KNOW they can count on? Ask them to be brutally honest with you. Perhaps more importantly do you always follow though what you start? Did you follow through on that New Year's resolution last year? The reason this is so important is because as a teacher YOU have to be the rock, the person that can always be counted on and the person who always backs up what they say they are going to do. Without this fundamental quality no one will respect you, most of all your students and that is the best way to hate your job and your life for about years before you quit. Do you genuinely have a passion for an academic subject? If so which one and can you think of why that matters so much to you? Kids come first, content comes second. Loving what you teach isn't nearly as important as loving who you teach. However, if you are going to spend a lengthy career doing this you better love math, or science, or art or whatever the academic subject is. If you don't have a genuine passion for the subject then you will fail to convey that passion to students and they will fail to see its importance to their lives. If you are a real science nerd then what makes you so passionate about it and WHY is it so important that future generations know this stuff? Is working with kids and talking about a subject you like all day worth four years of university study and tuition , long hours of tedious work, low pay, and little recognition to you? You have to really care about education, there are very few teachers out there in which, to them, teaching is just a job. That's because the level of commitment the job requires goes beyond most typical jobs. Teaching is more of a lifestyle where personal sacrifice is an understood norm. Are you the type that likes to leave work at work? Then teaching is probably not for you. Don't think summers off are all fun and relaxation either, usually teachers work a second job while preparing for the upcoming school year, many need to gain further education to renew their license and do so at their own expense. How do you feel about regimenting your life? Are you ok with being on a strict schedule before and after the work day? Are you an organized person? As a teacher, your job comes first and the day is very regimented..

Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? you accept being around kids that have significant disadvantages in life, mentally, emotionally, or socioeconomically and know there is almost nothing you can really do to help them?

If you become a teacher, you must know that a large percentage of kids that come through your class will have serious disadvantages in life.

Poverty is perhaps the number one factor that plays into how students perform academically. Many students have some type of major life obstacle such as abusive families, poverty, diseases, emotional disabilities, learning disabilities the list is literally endless. Can you accept these problems and realize there is very little you can do about it? Can you take the emotional stress that goes with working with these kids day in and day out for years?

Many times you will have to balance your expectations with what is realistically possible for them based on their life situations. Consider this heavily before jumping into the profession with both feet. There is so much more that Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? be discussed here, if you would like to learn a article source more you can read the original article here Is Teaching the Right Career for You?

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? straight to you. Education News Teachers Careers.

Is Teaching the Right Career for You? Real Life. Real News. Work on points for style later — get the message across first. Have to disagree on 2. The more general point about subject-verb agreement is important, though. Certainly there are rules that apply in any situation but language is a living, breathing thing and must be flexible.

I recently heard a story on a national radio program click the following article began with this line: There are tales, there are tall tales, and then there are super-sized tales.

Contractions can help your writing sound more natural. I encounter this in almost every article I edit. Just kidding, sort of. Thanks for sharing. Only better. Dump the rest, as in the pretentious subjunctive and the cumbersome he or she construction to make subject-predicate Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

work. Scott G: Andy Wood: I get the gist of your post and mostly agree. If I had to choose one thing to judge the merits of a piece Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? writing, it is the quality of the content, not the grammar. If you use perfect English and your writing is repetitive, boring or borders on plagiarism, then correct verb-subject agreement means little to me.

Other elements of communication are far more important. Are you all so picky about it? To think that two nations, over a period of more than years, would develop separations in their common language… unthinkable! We may have a lot of bad habits in this country, but I daresay that the English currently spoken in Great Britain is a far cry from the English that was spoken there years ago.

In many dialects, it is already just about equivalent — regardless of how much it annoys you. Something else will take its place or has. Semantic shift happens in every living language. In the medical world, this is something that would require the use of suppositories.

Anyone else bothered by this one? While I guess literally is used accurately in these cases, it just seems unnecessary most of the time. A worthy cause indeed for those writers who take pride in their craft to rise up and counter the onslaught of excuses for poor grammar—from just being conversational to Blackberry Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? text language.

It has been said that education is expensive, but not as expensive as ignorance. With these writing Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

becoming widely acceptable, what will be the cost? Funny, though, how some terms become used by the medical community and lose their other meanings. It has been relatively stable even since ancient Latin times. Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? all seriousness, this article was practical and I was able to put it to use immediately.

A hundred times, thank you! Latest Post: I like what Johnny had wrote. Its literally earth Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?. We all gots things we could get improved on with grammar. By the way, for those taking notes, notice how much more attention this post gets from Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

not trying to have the entire discussion in the post. Sure, some of these are subject to regional variation or can be argued for as common usage. Sonia — Exactly. I do not know everything. There are as many people vehemently fighting on one side of an issue as there are on the other. Chimps are funny. This post is currently the ninth most popular post on Copyblogger, ranking by number of comments and pingbacks. That makes me happy. Smitty wrote: If you Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

visit web page given suppositories for your impacted wisdom tooth, you need to change your dentist. Funny, because it is improperly used so Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?. Subjects, verbs, nouns, reflexive, etc….

Round And Brown Pussy

Thanks for the refresher. Great bit. That advice seems to help them break the habit! I hear it everywhere. Sometimes it makes me want to scream at the person talking. Come to Australia for a visit. Gimmier lickerish trap an some chicken-an look, fellers, no hens. The best thing is to have a Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? of humour and thanks for some of the hilarious input.

Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

For all intensive purposes, I hardly never sound like a chimp. I prefer screeching hyena. These are great. The an historic one is pretty bad.

Xxx Oceano Watch Video Sex Jepanv. Volunteer to tutor somewhere, monitor how you feel while doing it. If you skip this step you will have NO basis to answer this question and it is perhaps the most fundamental question you need to answer. This is tough to answer because we all like to think we are dependable and we get things done. This is where you need to be truly honest with yourself, are you the person that your friends KNOW they can count on? Ask them to be brutally honest with you. Perhaps more importantly do you always follow though what you start? Did you follow through on that New Year's resolution last year? The reason this is so important is because as a teacher YOU have to be the rock, the person that can always be counted on and the person who always backs up what they say they are going to do. Without this fundamental quality no one will respect you, most of all your students and that is the best way to hate your job and your life for about years before you quit. Do you genuinely have a passion for an academic subject? If so which one and can you think of why that matters so much to you? Kids come first, content comes second. Loving what you teach isn't nearly as important as loving who you teach. However, if you are going to spend a lengthy career doing this you better love math, or science, or art or whatever the academic subject is. If you don't have a genuine passion for the subject then you will fail to convey that passion to students and they will fail to see its importance to their lives. If you are a real science nerd then what makes you so passionate about it and WHY is it so important that future generations know this stuff? Is working with kids and talking about a subject you like all day worth four years of university study and tuition , long hours of tedious work, low pay, and little recognition to you? You have to really care about education, there are very few teachers out there in which, to them, teaching is just a job. That's because the level of commitment the job requires goes beyond most typical jobs. Teaching is more of a lifestyle where personal sacrifice is an understood norm. Are you the type that likes to leave work at work? Then teaching is probably not for you. Don't think summers off are all fun and relaxation either, usually teachers work a second job while preparing for the upcoming school year, many need to gain further education to renew their license and do so at their own expense. How do you feel about regimenting your life? Are you ok with being on a strict schedule before and after the work day? Are you an organized person? As a teacher, your job comes first and the day is very regimented. You are constantly in a cycle of writing lessons, teaching lessons, and grading assessments among many other various tasks. To do all that is demanded it requires teachers to be very organized in their before and after work activities. If I were — something that is never going to happen. If I was — something that could happen. For example:. Great piece. One that always trips me up is the use of adverbs. Probably yes, but it can lead to some cumbersome sentences. Regardless, good to see there are at least others on this blog who also suffer a language pedantry affliction. Will we ever recover? I just did a little research, which I should have done before asking my question! I checked out a few sites, here is one of the references I used: I found this stated in several websites. In there was a push for gender neutral pronouns worldwide, not just in America and the other countries mentioned above. Then in the 19th Century the tide turned again. It was started by a feministed school teacher. Sometimes a gender is evident and then the appropriate pronoun is used. I wanted to make a few points. So you can understand, most likely, why people are still using it at the present, even though it is considered incorrect by many grammarians. Finally, I wanted to say that finding a good solution for a universal pronoun is difficult for many. I find the invented pronouns just plain goofy! Take the article with a grain of salt. The only rule is that the rules will change over time… so to speak. This is but a snapshot of a language in motion, and with English spoken all over the world, cannot be accurate in every context. We no longer use the same English language that we used in the 10th century, or the 16th century. If someone is obsessive over using perfectly correct grammar, it could actually HINDER them from communicating effectively. Still, it never ceases to amaze me how popular these grammar discussions are. Reading the comments here has led me to ask about one other aggravation though this comes from my punctuation wench, not from from grammar wench , and it is this: What is that about? This distresses me. Cheers, all! Whilst in confession mode, I also split my infinitives if I think it makes a sentence read better and I regularly abuse dashes and points of elipsis. Why do English teachers in school find it very difficult to teach the subjunctive mood of the verb to their students? Yet you explained it very well and made it so easy to understand! Great write-up! I, too, am obsessed in finding grammatical errors on blogs though, of course, at times, I make mistakes, too. Gives me the shivers just writing it. Well, I must admit I am a little nervous to leave a comment that will be full of bad grammar and punctuation. Some bloggers insist that grammar is not that important, but that a little bad grammar shows their personality. So, good for you! By the way, one of my weaknesses is using commas everywhere and way too much…maybe you can do an article on punctuation next time! Like other parts of language, punctuation is also subject to change. I particularly like the interrobang. At last. I now feel free to move forward with my life. The relevant grammar rule is that a pronoun should agree in number with its antecedent. Why am I still reading this blog I ask myself. I should be asleep. Please stop posting — I need to be up in four hours …. Myself is going to the mall. Sam and I are going to the mall. I am going to the mall. I literally love this! Great visuals! I then blame in on my journalism degree and the faculty supervisor that ripped my writing to shreds when I wrote for the Oklahoma Daily many years ago. A couple of other pet peeves come to mind: Unique means one of a kind. Feel free us use that sentence in any post about overused metaphors. Thanks, Jan. Good points. It is evolving constantly and things that were not okay a long time ago, seem to be acceptable now. My partners English is not good, but my maths are lousy and he is a whiz on that score. Anyone got any help on that one. It is a source of amusement between the two of us. It sounds fine and makes perfect sense to everyone reading it. Then let me be the first to say you are nitpicking. I shall give it a go. Thank you for the learning, Johnny. Best regards, P. I require constant reminders although I excelled in grammar in my youth and even worked as a junior editor years ago. I appreciate that you cover a few common errors to brush up on, rather than a long list that is likely to blur together. The best tip I ever received from an editor: If you do not have access to an editor have anyone read your piece before publishing. Any sentence they stumble on should be checked for errors, or simplified if none found. If your guinea pig stumbles, others will too even if the grammar is officially correct. There already is such a blog. If nothing else, I can vouch for the latter meaning. Just read through any rulebook published by White Wolf Games. BTW, I remember being taught in grammar school that putting oneself last in a list of people was considered polite. My personal pet language peeve is semantic rather than grammatical. Else, they are statements. End of story. Work on points for style later — get the message across first. Have to disagree on 2. The more general point about subject-verb agreement is important, though. Certainly there are rules that apply in any situation but language is a living, breathing thing and must be flexible. I recently heard a story on a national radio program that began with this line: There are tales, there are tall tales, and then there are super-sized tales. Contractions can help your writing sound more natural. I encounter this in almost every article I edit. Just kidding, sort of. Thanks for sharing. Only better. Dump the rest, as in the pretentious subjunctive and the cumbersome he or she construction to make subject-predicate agreement work. Scott G: Andy Wood: I get the gist of your post and mostly agree. If I had to choose one thing to judge the merits of a piece of writing, it is the quality of the content, not the grammar. If you use perfect English and your writing is repetitive, boring or borders on plagiarism, then correct verb-subject agreement means little to me. Other elements of communication are far more important. Are you all so picky about it? To think that two nations, over a period of more than years, would develop separations in their common language… unthinkable! We may have a lot of bad habits in this country, but I daresay that the English currently spoken in Great Britain is a far cry from the English that was spoken there years ago. In many dialects, it is already just about equivalent — regardless of how much it annoys you. Something else will take its place or has. Semantic shift happens in every living language. In the medical world, this is something that would require the use of suppositories. Anyone else bothered by this one? While I guess literally is used accurately in these cases, it just seems unnecessary most of the time. A worthy cause indeed for those writers who take pride in their craft to rise up and counter the onslaught of excuses for poor grammar—from just being conversational to Blackberry and text language. It has been said that education is expensive, but not as expensive as ignorance. With these writing habits becoming widely acceptable, what will be the cost? Funny, though, how some terms become used by the medical community and lose their other meanings. It has been relatively stable even since ancient Latin times. In all seriousness, this article was practical and I was able to put it to use immediately. A hundred times, thank you! Latest Post: I like what Johnny had wrote. Its literally earth shaking. We all gots things we could get improved on with grammar. By the way, for those taking notes, notice how much more attention this post gets from Johnny not trying to have the entire discussion in the post. Sure, some of these are subject to regional variation or can be argued for as common usage. Sonia — Exactly. I do not know everything. There are as many people vehemently fighting on one side of an issue as there are on the other. Chimps are funny. This post is currently the ninth most popular post on Copyblogger, ranking by number of comments and pingbacks. That makes me happy. Smitty wrote: If you have been given suppositories for your impacted wisdom tooth, you need to change your dentist. Funny, because it is improperly used so often. Subjects, verbs, nouns, reflexive, etc…. Thanks for the refresher. Great bit. That advice seems to help them break the habit! I hear it everywhere. Sometimes it makes me want to scream at the person talking. Come to Australia for a visit. Gimmier lickerish trap an some chicken-an look, fellers, no hens. The best thing is to have a sense of humour and thanks for some of the hilarious input. For all intensive purposes, I hardly never sound like a chimp. I prefer screeching hyena. These are great. The an historic one is pretty bad. Nice but you left our my most hated one. It makes me grind me teeth and want to punch the person who writes it. I do think myself has developed an emphatic role which I can sometimes tolerate, but most times it sounds stupid. This ship has sailed. Your best hope is to learn to love it. Try it out at least twice a day till it feels natural. Otherwise, you are doomed to fuddyduddyville. Absolutely right. And if literally loses its meaning how will we distinguish the real from the false? Other than common sense, I mean. I hate relying on that. Literally hate it. WTF is with that? Extremely helpful!!! I always make a mistake on that one. The word they with its counterparts them, their, and themselves as a singular pronoun to refer to a person of unspecified sex has been used since at least the 16th century. It makes it seem like I am bragging and is just filling up space with no need for it. Everyone began looking for their books at once. Such use is not a recent development, nor is it a mark of ignorance. Shakespeare, Swift, Shelley, Scott, and Dickens, as well as many other English and American writers, have used they and its forms to refer to singular antecedents. Already widespread in the language though still rejected as ungrammatical by some , this use of they, their, and them is increasing in all but the most conservatively edited American English. This increased use is at least partly impelled by the desire to avoid the sexist implications of he as a pronoun of general reference. Bock, my 5th grade English teacher for giving me the simplest of litmus tests. Parsons out of the sentence. When it doubt, the simplest way to figure out what to use is to leave the other folks out of the sentence. Then, of course, add them back in: Parsons and me. Great piece of writing. As you say, once or twice is acceptable, any more and my interest is lost. When interesting titles go bad. Article good. Misleading title that had nothing to do with the post bad. An historically bad title myself was not soon to forget. Nice article, and no argument with the grammar points. Although we may not like it, language changes. And there are always those that hate to let go. In the rule Was vs Were, what would be the case in the event it was used to describe an action of someone else, i. Please read: This made my day! Grammar nerdery is a wonderful thing. I have to stop following this thread, as it shows all signs of going on forever. But until then …. Pretty entertaining stuff! Thanks for this post, John! Very interesting article! Many people with native language different than english do common sense errors in their blogs instead promoting clean and crisp language…. There is literally a blog that tracks literally: This was driving me crazy the other day. Every source I checked seemed to have a different opinion. The sentence would still make sense without it and could be moved: Fly, be free. Worry about fluency. And if you already have it, then stop worrying about language and get on with it. Laroquod said at 6: Well, yes. But that means that 10 percent of your readers stop mid-sentence to think: He split an infinitive. To me, writing should be invisible. I am trying to communicate a very specific message, and anything that undermines my communication is defeating my object. So I try to avoid them. Just as I try to avoid showing off in a way that might impress and so interrupt the flow of another 10 percent. Of course, none of this works for a readership that comprises professional writers, because everyone in that group will scrutinize every word. No, Marc. I should have said that I recommend that good writers—like good chefs—should focus on their goals to turn on readers or diners rather than to show off too obviously their technical skills. Wow, you literally cut poeple up — including myself — chewed them, and and then spat them out! Truth is, I hate the man or woman who makes these mistakes, too. Are they an hillbilly or something? Just so everyone knows, this post has made me paranoid. See how flexible I am? It just drives me crazy literally! Chimps abound, apparently. Could it concern something other than simply just ignorance? That it shows up in writing demonstrates the way in which grammar is shaped. Oh Johnny… you had me. I was literally ha going to start telling all that would listen about your brilliance, your beauty surely all grammar snobs are beautiful , your… hmmm, what is the word? Your rightness. And then, much to my chagrin, you committed one of my own pet peeves in comment You cannot come up with a better choice of words? Just tell me that you spontaneously developed a 23rd chromosome and all will be right in the world. Would you like another example: Wait, wait, wait. Hold on. Sarah Turner I write both in French and in English, and, like Johnny B. There are writers who are as dangerous as bad drivers. But there is another side to that coin. I try to write as well as I know how. When we close our door each day and stride to the front of the classroom, it's easy to fall prey to the illusion that we are in charge. It's your name on that door, after all, so you must be the boss. Parents are the boss of you. The administration is the boss of you. Common Core is the boss of you. The students can sense it, which occasionally leads to comments like, "My parents pay your salary, you know. And because of that truth, there is often immense pressure to compromise your integrity: Despite my aforementioned friend's ignorance, I'll give her this: Pee 2. Get coffee 3. Spend fifteen minutes chatting leisurely with a colleague 4. Go out to lunch 5. Complete paperwork and other job-related tasks during the actual work day 6. Sit down occasionally. I'm pretty sure the real reason summer break exists is because the School Gods counted up all the seconds you don't get to use the bathroom and handed them back to you in one big chunk. Twenty-five-minute lunches are not conducive to nice, relaxing meals beyond the building's walls, and you can only relieve yourself during passing time -- which, unfortunately, is the only opportunity all the OTHER teachers have to take care of business. Adding to the sting of your not-in-charge-ness, many people who ARE in charge have literally never taught a day in their lives -- and a lot of them are pretty sure they know how to do it better than you. Most people have lights in their home, but that doesn't make them electricians. My husband doesn't know how to manage a restaurant just because we've gone out to eat. SVU once a week? Surely, teaching is different, though, right? At some point, just about everyone has sat in a classroom. We were all students, after all. Six, seven, eight hours a day, ever since preschool, everyone has seen this job, so everyone is allowed to have an opinion. But even brand new teachers can tell: So when your high, high, highest-ups are committees of people who only know what it's like to be a student, it feels akin to a team of accountants trying to wire a building. For a while now, teachers have been battling an increasing pressure to "teach to the test. Art and music programs are still in grave danger -- and, in some districts , have already been slashed to ribbons. An elementary school teacher I know -- who is a part of one of the wealthiest, most reputable districts in her state -- attended a recent meeting where staff members were instructed to "drastically limit or entirely eliminate" story time. They deserve to gather around a rocking chair and feed their imaginations. They deserve the magic of a captivating story. English teachers look on helplessly as more and more works of fiction are plucked from the curriculum and replaced by fact-driven nonfiction. Even though we're sometimes invited to join curriculum committees as I did under the guise that we might have a say, it's ultimately just a ruse: But here's the thing: Our beloved works of fiction aren't just getting elbowed aside by facts and figures. They're also being trounced by the frenetic crush of technology. There's an app -- er, a reason -- for that. This one is tricky. But I might argue that our job is also to challenge our students with something new -- and, to this generation, technology is not new. In fact, it is all they know. Our kids don't need more of it -- most of them have been swiping and zooming and smartphone-ing since they were toddlers -- and they continue to do it right in the middle of your probably fact-driven lecture about some probably nonfiction book, by the way. It's incredibly frustrating when all that glorious innovation serves as more of a distraction than a learning tool. Though we teachers tend to stick together, I also have a group of friends and family with a wide range of careers -- they run the gamut from successful marketers to mechanical engineers to human resource managers. All of them have interviewed prospective employees for over a decade, and all of them now have a similar complaint: The three C's people suddenly seem to be missing? Curiosity, creativity, and communication skills. Technology is wonderful -- nay, necessary -- for a plethora of things, but it's killing those beautiful C's. And as a teacher, you don't just witness the death, you are expected to assist in the murder. Because of standardized expectations, you must incorporate more and more tech, even when all you want to do is take a hammer to anything with a screen. The air inside your classroom walls is probably thick with the stench of "It's not my fault, it's your fault," and it sure seems like the smell is coming from the students. Like cigarette smoke, it gets carried in from home, rising from their backpacks, woven through the threads of their clothes and the fibers of their upbringing. Their whole lives, generations of special snowflakes have received copious awards and accolades just for playing -- NOT for excelling -- so it's no wonder kids have come to expect an A "because I tried. It means that Johnny might have actually earned a D this time. It means he might not have written a perfect paper. Brace yourself for the irate phone call in the morning. Of course, for every helicopter parent, there is a devastatingly absentee parent, as well as an equal number who are so remarkably supportive that you wonder if they're even real. They are warm and generous and responsible..

Nice but you left our my most hated one. It makes me grind me teeth and want to punch the person who writes it. I do think myself has developed an emphatic Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? which I can sometimes tolerate, but most times it sounds stupid. This ship has Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?. Your best hope is to learn to love it. Try it out at least twice a Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? till it feels natural.

Otherwise, you are doomed to fuddyduddyville. Absolutely right. And if literally loses its meaning how will we distinguish the real from the false? Other than common sense, I mean. I hate relying on that. Literally hate it. WTF is with that? Extremely helpful!!! I always make a mistake on that one. The word they with its counterparts them, their, and themselves as a singular pronoun to refer to a person of unspecified sex has been used since at least the 16th century.

It makes it seem like I am bragging and is just filling up space with no need for it. Everyone began looking for their books at once. Such use is not a recent development, nor is it a mark of ignorance.

Shakespeare, Swift, Shelley, Scott, and Dickens, as well as many other English and American writers, have used they and its forms to refer to singular antecedents. Already widespread in the language though still rejected as ungrammatical by somethis use of they, their, and them is increasing in all but the most conservatively edited American English.

This increased use is at least Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? impelled by the desire to avoid the sexist implications of he as a pronoun of general reference. Bock, my 5th grade English teacher for giving me the simplest of litmus tests. Parsons out of the learn more here. When it doubt, the simplest way to figure out what to use is to leave the other folks out of the sentence.

Then, of course, add them back in: Parsons and me. Great piece of writing. As you say, once or twice is acceptable, any more and my interest is lost. When interesting titles go bad. Article good. Misleading title that had nothing to do with the post bad. An historically bad title myself was not soon to forget. Nice article, and no argument with the grammar points. Although we may Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? like it, language changes. And there are always those that hate to let go. In the rule Was vs Were, what would be the case in the event it was used to describe an action of someone else, i.

Please read: This made my day! Grammar nerdery is a wonderful thing. I have to stop following this thread, as it shows all signs of going on forever.

But until then …. Pretty entertaining stuff! Thanks for this post, John! Very interesting article! Many people with native language different than english do common sense errors in their blogs instead promoting clean and crisp language….

There is literally a blog that tracks literally: This was driving me crazy the other day. Every source I checked seemed to have a different opinion. Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? sentence would still make sense without it and could be moved: Fly, be free. Worry about fluency. And if you already have it, then stop worrying about language and get on with it.

Laroquod said at 6: Well, yes. But that means Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? 10 percent of your readers stop mid-sentence to think: He split an infinitive. To me, writing should be invisible. I am trying to communicate a very specific message, and anything that undermines my communication is defeating my object. So I try Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? avoid them. Just as I try to avoid showing off in a way that might impress and so interrupt the flow of another 10 percent. Of course, none of this works for a readership that comprises professional writers, because everyone in that group will scrutinize every word.

No, Marc. I should have said that I recommend that good writers—like good chefs—should focus on their goals to turn on readers or diners rather than to show off too obviously their technical skills. Wow, you literally cut poeple up — including myself — chewed them, and and then spat them out! Truth is, I hate the man or woman who makes these mistakes, too. Are they an hillbilly or something?

Just so everyone knows, this post has made me paranoid. See how flexible I am? It just drives me crazy literally! Chimps abound, apparently. Could it concern something other than simply just ignorance? That Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? shows up in writing demonstrates the Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? in which grammar is shaped.

Oh Johnny… you had me. I was literally ha going to start telling all that would listen about your brilliance, your beauty surely all grammar snobs are beautifulyour… hmmm, what is the word? Your rightness. And Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?, much to my chagrin, you committed one of my own pet peeves in comment You cannot come up with a better choice of words?

Just tell me that you spontaneously developed a 23rd chromosome and all will be right in the world. Would you like another example: Wait, wait, wait. Hold on. Sarah Turner I write both source French and in English, and, like Johnny B.

There are writers who are as dangerous as bad drivers. But there is another side to that coin. I try to write as well as I know how. Which may be why I never try to humiliate anyone else when they do. The chances of my ever successfully constructing a bookcase are minimal. The chances of my ever returning a tennis serve are similar. Pointing and laughing are bad ways to foster talent. Those who are interested in writing will quickly discover the basic rules, and will — like the rest of Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

— Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? on a lifetime of learning. Great post, One really easy tip to Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? to them is this: Make sure you check a post or comment before hitting the send button. I think we can finally consider that a correct meaning. Meanings change. But after a while even the most pedantic just have to let go. And I think nearly three centuries is long enough. You are not crazy. It sounds better. That is all it takes — how does it sound best.

Of course, the words have to be pronounced correctly, something most Americans seem incapable of. This is how you Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

manage to read a history book to learn about an historical event, and be correct. It is a rather outdated rule that continues to change over time as we continue to pronounce things differently.

Language shifts, but at this point in time, it is still acceptable. People will get angry at you for it, but people will always be there to defend you for it as well because technically both are correct. Give it another couple of decades, and it may be gone forever. Do you think this is an example of language constantly changing, which I suppose could reasonably be claimed given the number of times Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

hear it in a week? Or are they getting it wrong and therefore should be corrected? However, they are the source of language change and, when adopted by enough people especially people with power they are considered legitimate language changes. Can you tell me where this is? Should you correct them? At the very least, they should know the more standard meaning of the word lend.

Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

People should have access to that so that they can be best understood by others outside their immediate social groups, and also so that they have more opportunities for social advancement.

But explain to them, too, that in school it has a different meaning and you want them to use that meaning for practice. Of course, whether your correcting has much effect is another matter entirely. Peers have more influence on our speech than teachers or even parents. Alistair Keep up the good work and continue correcting. I recently came to the conclusion that language is an evolving thing but there https://belstaffjackets.online/toes/video9205-woqure.php some words, quite a lot of them, that are exempt from this theory.

I agree, Christine. And that really makes me sad. Cassie How funny. A very good friend of mine, an English teacher, used to tell me that there was no such thing as correct spelling, for precisely the same reason — that language is constantly evolving. I told him this is completely ridiculous. I have also been told that as a Science teacher, I should ignore misspellings and grammatical errors as we should be focusing solely on the Science. However, my argument is that being able source communicate effectively is part of being a scientist, and if pupils are unable to do that then they are not being good scientists.

The British Government had a great idea in the 60s; they decided the best way of teaching Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? was to encourage pupils to write phonetically. Unfortunately, it was much more difficult to read because of all of the possible phonetic variations and led, ultimately, to a generation that struggled — and still struggles — with literacy.

However, we have to aim to uphold the standards so that people can communicate effectively. By the way, I have a feeling that the reference to chimps was probably made in humour and not intended to cause offence. They may sound very different to you, but to a complete outsider there will probably be Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

more similarities than differences. The fact that it Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? that widespread actually points to there being more going on than just a few Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? kids. Where are they getting it from?

Other than being young, are there any other similarities between the kids socially? Are they of a similar social class, for example? In addition to the geographical variation that we call dialects, there are also sociolects, language varieties among certain social groups which can be defined not just by social class, but Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

gender, age, ethnicity, even attitudes, etc. The two are not mutually exclusive. By the way, I agree with you about teaching proper spelling — at least as much as it can be taught. Knowing standardized spelling makes Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? not only easier to be understood, it also makes it easier to recognize words quickly when reading. Again, it is not necessary that the students always spell correctly.

It kills me much more than the five listed here. Another case of people trying to sound intelligent. Very interesting grammar Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?, expecially for me as a learner of the English language.

Which word sounds correct in that sentence? Then you just add Bob and Mr. Parsons back into the sentence: Parsons, and me. You can check my comment above for more detail, or click here: Some would argue that it is correct if we hear it on the CBC.

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I just re-read my own blog entry and found a spelling error. Spell checkers have become my crutch. The CBC is certainly not an authority. In addition to some of their usage, there is the matter of how they pronounce many click. I must admit, however, that they do pay attention even if it takes many years. Best Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? from another Anton! I just love it when a favourite maverick shows his anal Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

When a person is slated with selecting the committee, then including oneself in the committee is a reflexive act. The sentence: The speaker is just an object put in the committee with the other objects.

Awesome Article ….

Video Games Watch Video Missmiafit nude. That it shows up in writing demonstrates the way in which grammar is shaped. Oh Johnny… you had me. I was literally ha going to start telling all that would listen about your brilliance, your beauty surely all grammar snobs are beautiful , your… hmmm, what is the word? Your rightness. And then, much to my chagrin, you committed one of my own pet peeves in comment You cannot come up with a better choice of words? Just tell me that you spontaneously developed a 23rd chromosome and all will be right in the world. Would you like another example: Wait, wait, wait. Hold on. Sarah Turner I write both in French and in English, and, like Johnny B. There are writers who are as dangerous as bad drivers. But there is another side to that coin. I try to write as well as I know how. Which may be why I never try to humiliate anyone else when they do. The chances of my ever successfully constructing a bookcase are minimal. The chances of my ever returning a tennis serve are similar. Pointing and laughing are bad ways to foster talent. Those who are interested in writing will quickly discover the basic rules, and will — like the rest of us — embark on a lifetime of learning. Great post, One really easy tip to add to them is this: Make sure you check a post or comment before hitting the send button. I think we can finally consider that a correct meaning. Meanings change. But after a while even the most pedantic just have to let go. And I think nearly three centuries is long enough. You are not crazy. It sounds better. That is all it takes — how does it sound best. Of course, the words have to be pronounced correctly, something most Americans seem incapable of. This is how you would manage to read a history book to learn about an historical event, and be correct. It is a rather outdated rule that continues to change over time as we continue to pronounce things differently. Language shifts, but at this point in time, it is still acceptable. People will get angry at you for it, but people will always be there to defend you for it as well because technically both are correct. Give it another couple of decades, and it may be gone forever. Do you think this is an example of language constantly changing, which I suppose could reasonably be claimed given the number of times I hear it in a week? Or are they getting it wrong and therefore should be corrected? However, they are the source of language change and, when adopted by enough people especially people with power they are considered legitimate language changes. Can you tell me where this is? Should you correct them? At the very least, they should know the more standard meaning of the word lend. People should have access to that so that they can be best understood by others outside their immediate social groups, and also so that they have more opportunities for social advancement. But explain to them, too, that in school it has a different meaning and you want them to use that meaning for practice. Of course, whether your correcting has much effect is another matter entirely. Peers have more influence on our speech than teachers or even parents. Alistair Keep up the good work and continue correcting. I recently came to the conclusion that language is an evolving thing but there are some words, quite a lot of them, that are exempt from this theory. I agree, Christine. And that really makes me sad. Cassie How funny. A very good friend of mine, an English teacher, used to tell me that there was no such thing as correct spelling, for precisely the same reason — that language is constantly evolving. I told him this is completely ridiculous. I have also been told that as a Science teacher, I should ignore misspellings and grammatical errors as we should be focusing solely on the Science. However, my argument is that being able to communicate effectively is part of being a scientist, and if pupils are unable to do that then they are not being good scientists. The British Government had a great idea in the 60s; they decided the best way of teaching English was to encourage pupils to write phonetically. Unfortunately, it was much more difficult to read because of all of the possible phonetic variations and led, ultimately, to a generation that struggled — and still struggles — with literacy. However, we have to aim to uphold the standards so that people can communicate effectively. By the way, I have a feeling that the reference to chimps was probably made in humour and not intended to cause offence. They may sound very different to you, but to a complete outsider there will probably be far more similarities than differences. The fact that it is that widespread actually points to there being more going on than just a few ignorant kids. Where are they getting it from? Other than being young, are there any other similarities between the kids socially? Are they of a similar social class, for example? In addition to the geographical variation that we call dialects, there are also sociolects, language varieties among certain social groups which can be defined not just by social class, but also gender, age, ethnicity, even attitudes, etc. The two are not mutually exclusive. By the way, I agree with you about teaching proper spelling — at least as much as it can be taught. Knowing standardized spelling makes it not only easier to be understood, it also makes it easier to recognize words quickly when reading. Again, it is not necessary that the students always spell correctly. It kills me much more than the five listed here. Another case of people trying to sound intelligent. Very interesting grammar read, expecially for me as a learner of the English language. Which word sounds correct in that sentence? Then you just add Bob and Mr. Parsons back into the sentence: Parsons, and me. You can check my comment above for more detail, or click here: Some would argue that it is correct if we hear it on the CBC. I just re-read my own blog entry and found a spelling error. Spell checkers have become my crutch. The CBC is certainly not an authority. In addition to some of their usage, there is the matter of how they pronounce many words. I must admit, however, that they do pay attention even if it takes many years. Best regards from another Anton! I just love it when a favourite maverick shows his anal side! When a person is slated with selecting the committee, then including oneself in the committee is a reflexive act. The sentence: The speaker is just an object put in the committee with the other objects. Awesome Article …. Dear friend some times mistakes becomes so common that become part of writing. I ask him: He responds: I think both are okay. Thank you. Skip to primary navigation Skip to content Skip to primary sidebar. Writing can be really no-win. For example: Was vs. Get Grammarly. Previous article: Landing Page Makeover Clinic Next article: Finding Your Village of Customers. Reader Comments Another great piece Johnny. The error that irks me the most is: Where do people pick this up? Do high-school English teachers allow it? The two errors that bother me the most: Blake Waddill. The committee will consist of Bob, Mr Parsons and I. Okay, nobody has yet 1. Called me an elitist butthole for nitpicking these things. I really have to stop monitoring this thread…. Would you say: I like the mall Santa story. So take your example: Ah, and the axiom proves true yet again: Anyone want to fight to the death over this one? I say the following is wrong: Sean — One of my favorites, but CB has already done that one. Interestingly, I was reading the blogs of several noted professional copyeditors earlier this week, and two items struck me: Drew — oops. Go, Be, yup. My bad, busted. Change the list to sandwiches: RE point 1: Just curious! Good article btw. Awesome article… It drives me crazy to see bad grammar in blogs — I know I do it too, but it still drives me nuts! Johnny B! Marc — One word: WTF is that stuff? Ground artichokes and bone meal? I totally abuse the ellipsis… The reason I use it so much is: Anyone got any tips on appropriate use or non-use of these various devices? Also, no last serial comma. Thanks for the help! Grammar FTW! I and me. You might consider doing the same. Anon, You might consider not being an annoying spoilsport. Good article. My grandmother was a grammar teacher so. Awesome post. Always good stuff coming from you. Forget it. Their examples, with which I agree completely, are: At the bar, two strippers were all over Jim and I. Two strippers were all over Jim and Me. Grammar Posts seem to get folks revved up; you might as well write about religion or politics. That said…. Not least because nearly all of us are chimps at least some of the time. And if one values grace, this sentence: Further, it forces the writer to conflate two meanings that are distinct: I literally thought this article was great! Great post, but one nitpick: Hey Johnny, Great post, and a very good read too. Look it up. Meg she who hath no website said: Bonzo agree. Bonzo like bananas, consequence-free sex, and literal nit-picking. Sorry, I swore earlier I was staying out of this comment thread. I need help. I had a rant about some aspects of this topic myself just last week. The growth and development of language give great pleasures to its lovers. Sigh — I must be getting old. I sound like my English teacher from 40 years ago! That one could get epic. Michelle, I was not looking for typos in this article. Wow, this post sure generated a lot of comments! Now, I literally feel much better. I am going to challenge you on 4. If I were a cat, I would nap all day. Here is a great blog post that explains it better than me: Johnny I just did a little research, which I should have done before asking my question! Some of these invented pronouns are: You get the idea, we could go on and on in making these things up, and many have! Perhaps we should really have a post: This post has added much dork-laden glee to my otherwise dull day. Hi Johnny, Well, I must admit I am a little nervous to leave a comment that will be full of bad grammar and punctuation. I LOVE this post! Sorry for the all caps. What this post disregards is the evolutionary nature of language. Take it there, bring it here. This is a clear case of how the English language is being butchered by Americanisation. Well, practically impossible, anyway. What a sizzling debate. Write like you talk—only better. As many bloggers know, conversational writing is easy, effective and engaging. So seriously, nobody remembers Lancelot Link, Secret Chimp? Some examples: So, perhaps some caveats are in order when making posts such as this? Wonderful post, J! Also, comment addict that he is, I think he may have in fact perished of happiness. Thank you Peter. Great blog, interesting content…. Great post, Johnny. Does anyone remember being told not to use a colon after a verb? Incorrect- My favorite foods are: So, how is my colon LOL in my last post? Do I need a colon: I will join you in strangling anyone who does this. They deserve nothing less. Get me on Twitter so I can respond — johnnybtruant. Absolutely wonderful post! We are not amused… From the Oxford English Dictionary: But this does: Johnny, my host broke my email. Following you now on Twitter. DM me. I have one… In the rule Was vs Were, what would be the case in the event it was used to describe an action of someone else, i. Please, Johnny, lock the comments so I can get back to work! What do you think? Jodi Ooops, sorry. I mistook you for Carolyn…. Thanks for correcting me. People who seriously get annoyed at these transgressions, like Ms. Manners here, bore me. Incidentally, how long does a comment need to be in order to be worth two pennies? Chris Raymond There are writers who are as dangerous as bad drivers. Those who have no talent will quickly fall by the wayside. Why waste time abusing them? Absolutely, Cassie. I have an acute case of irritable larynx syndrome. Inflammatory, perhaps, judging by the length of this comment list, but not crazy! I agree wholeheartedly with the rest of the list though! Bernhard, The answer to your question is this: Drop Bob and Mr. Parsons from the sentence. In other words: My children DO try. I do not EVER want them to feel like they are anything less than the most important people in the world. When my daughter's preschool note tells me she was not a good listener that day, I feel frustrated and helpless and a little bit sure the teacher is just being too demanding. When she ran her first Toddler Turkey Trot last November, the people in charge asked if I wanted to buy her a medal. But as a teacher, this is what you wish you could say: Stop making excuses for your kids. Teach them to earn things, not demand things. Hold them to a higher standard. Challenge them. That way, when I try to challenge them, they'll know we both expect it. Left to their own devices, the kids will be the first to tell you: Yeah, I totally forgot about that assignment. I didn't really try my best. I just didn't feel like finishing the reading. Whoops -- sorry, Ms. They'll cringe at you with raised eyebrows and endearing self-awareness. They'll laugh uproariously when you pull a pretend trophy from your desk and give it a quick shine as soon as they catch themselves in the act of whining. They know. Deep down, despite that wafting air of entitlement, they know exactly what's going on. They are smarter than that, and they are capable of more failures -- and consequently, more successes -- than the world is allowing them to experience. In order for people to really know how well you're doing your job, they have to watch you do it. But when there is only one administrator for every thirty-plus teachers, adequate observation time is often a physical impossibility. Even if an administrator's ONLY JOB was to sit in classroom after classroom, there would still be too few hours in the day, so lawmakers and district higher-ups are scrambling to figure out a way to fill in the blanks. A popular bright idea is to examine students' test scores. In theory, this should work -- but in practice, you've got to be kidding. Students are not products tumbling off a cookie-cutter assembly line. They are human beings , and there are thirty-five of them per class period, and they are influenced by FAR more than yesterday's vocabulary lesson. You are not in charge of how well they slept, or the breakup that happened last week, or if their family has enough money for breakfast -- but all of those things affect test scores. So do IEPs, plans, and whether or not you are teaching an AP or Honors class filled with students who might perform well with or without your help. As more and more districts begin to adopt this nonsensical practice, who will teach the kids who are struggling? Some of the very best teachers do that now, with only intrinsic motivation working to retain them. Another method is to place the burden of proof upon the teacher. Instead of spending your prep hour -- or your Sunday night -- creating a brilliant lesson plan or grading the ten dozen essays you just collected, you must spend that time figuring out how to meet arbitrary goals and initiatives that will become irrelevant and obsolete by the following school year. After that, you must waste utilize class time implementing said goals and initiatives, and then you must spend more prep time and Sunday nights writing reports to prove how well you implemented them. That, combined with your students' test scores, shall determine whether or not you are an effective educator. Can I please just talk about Of Mice and Men instead? Can we spend that time learning why some words on a page just made us cry a little bit? That's the important stuff. That's what matters. Those are the things that teach us who we are. Here are the other things that matter: Helping a group of students work through a disagreement civilly. Keeping everyone calm when someone vomits on the floor. Watching the shyest student in your class, the one who never ever spoke back in September, volunteer to read a part in The Crucible -- and he's hilarious, and he does it with an accent , and he makes two new friends because he finally let himself be vulnerable. Your job is so much more than test scores, meaningless goals, and cyclical initiatives. It is tying shoelaces and distributing Band-Aids. It is listening to a parent cry about her crumbling marriage. It is showing teenagers how to debate thoughtfully, how to think critically, how to disagree respectfully. It is hearing from students ten years after graduation, because they just thought you should know it was your Spanish class that made them want to study abroad, your passion for science that led to a major in biochemistry, your quiet encouragement during their dark days that convinced them to keep coming to school in the first place. Where does that fall on the "highly effective" checklist? How can you document that kind of delayed impact? It certainly can't be measured by A's and E's, or even by weekly walk-throughs. It's no wonder you're getting frustrated. But if these are the reasons you might leave, here is the reason you might stay: The kids. After a year without them, you might miss their unbridled school spirit during Homecoming Week, their contagious sense of humor, the way they draw pictures for you and wave joyous hellos in the hallways. You might miss their ability to make you forget about the rough start to your morning, or the looks of awe on their captivated faces when they finally learn something that matters. Without this fundamental quality no one will respect you, most of all your students and that is the best way to hate your job and your life for about years before you quit. Do you genuinely have a passion for an academic subject? If so which one and can you think of why that matters so much to you? Kids come first, content comes second. Loving what you teach isn't nearly as important as loving who you teach. However, if you are going to spend a lengthy career doing this you better love math, or science, or art or whatever the academic subject is. If you don't have a genuine passion for the subject then you will fail to convey that passion to students and they will fail to see its importance to their lives. If you are a real science nerd then what makes you so passionate about it and WHY is it so important that future generations know this stuff? Is working with kids and talking about a subject you like all day worth four years of university study and tuition , long hours of tedious work, low pay, and little recognition to you? You have to really care about education, there are very few teachers out there in which, to them, teaching is just a job. That's because the level of commitment the job requires goes beyond most typical jobs. Teaching is more of a lifestyle where personal sacrifice is an understood norm. Are you the type that likes to leave work at work? Then teaching is probably not for you. Don't think summers off are all fun and relaxation either, usually teachers work a second job while preparing for the upcoming school year, many need to gain further education to renew their license and do so at their own expense. How do you feel about regimenting your life? Are you ok with being on a strict schedule before and after the work day? Are you an organized person? As a teacher, your job comes first and the day is very regimented. You are constantly in a cycle of writing lessons, teaching lessons, and grading assessments among many other various tasks. To do all that is demanded it requires teachers to be very organized in their before and after work activities. Time management is one of the most important skills any good teacher has and if you tend to be a procrastinator you will get buried. Also some people are not cut out for a very regimented work day. This isn't corporate America where you may get an hour for lunch with breaks throughout the day. You have thirty minutes for lunch which many teachers work through to get more work done. Remember it is your responsibility to keep track of about kids, not just their grades but many times what is going on in their lives that could affect them. If you sometimes think "I can barely keep track of my own life" then you may need to work on your organization skills if you are to become a teacher. Can you accept being around kids that have significant disadvantages in life, mentally, emotionally, or socioeconomically and know there is almost nothing you can really do to help them? If you become a teacher, you must know that a large percentage of kids that come through your class will have serious disadvantages in life..

Dear friend some times mistakes becomes so common that become part of writing. Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? ask him: Source responds: I think both are okay. Thank you. Skip to primary navigation Skip to content Skip to primary sidebar. Writing can be really no-win. Can I please just talk about Of Mice and Men instead?

Can we spend that time learning why some words on a page just made us cry a little bit? That's the important stuff. That's what matters. Those Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? the things that teach us who we are. Here are the other things that matter: Helping a group of students work through a disagreement civilly.

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Keeping everyone calm when someone vomits on the floor. Watching the shyest student in your class, the one who never ever spoke back in September, volunteer to read a part in The Crucible -- and he's hilarious, and he does Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? with an accentand he makes two new friends because he finally let himself be vulnerable.

Your job is so much more than test scores, meaningless goals, and cyclical initiatives. It is tying shoelaces and distributing Band-Aids. It Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? listening to a parent cry about her crumbling marriage.

Nude car Watch Video Xxx Indonesa. I should be asleep. Please stop posting — I need to be up in four hours …. Myself is going to the mall. Sam and I are going to the mall. I am going to the mall. I literally love this! Great visuals! I then blame in on my journalism degree and the faculty supervisor that ripped my writing to shreds when I wrote for the Oklahoma Daily many years ago. A couple of other pet peeves come to mind: Unique means one of a kind. Feel free us use that sentence in any post about overused metaphors. Thanks, Jan. Good points. It is evolving constantly and things that were not okay a long time ago, seem to be acceptable now. My partners English is not good, but my maths are lousy and he is a whiz on that score. Anyone got any help on that one. It is a source of amusement between the two of us. It sounds fine and makes perfect sense to everyone reading it. Then let me be the first to say you are nitpicking. I shall give it a go. Thank you for the learning, Johnny. Best regards, P. I require constant reminders although I excelled in grammar in my youth and even worked as a junior editor years ago. I appreciate that you cover a few common errors to brush up on, rather than a long list that is likely to blur together. The best tip I ever received from an editor: If you do not have access to an editor have anyone read your piece before publishing. Any sentence they stumble on should be checked for errors, or simplified if none found. If your guinea pig stumbles, others will too even if the grammar is officially correct. There already is such a blog. If nothing else, I can vouch for the latter meaning. Just read through any rulebook published by White Wolf Games. BTW, I remember being taught in grammar school that putting oneself last in a list of people was considered polite. My personal pet language peeve is semantic rather than grammatical. Else, they are statements. End of story. Work on points for style later — get the message across first. Have to disagree on 2. The more general point about subject-verb agreement is important, though. Certainly there are rules that apply in any situation but language is a living, breathing thing and must be flexible. I recently heard a story on a national radio program that began with this line: There are tales, there are tall tales, and then there are super-sized tales. Contractions can help your writing sound more natural. I encounter this in almost every article I edit. Just kidding, sort of. Thanks for sharing. Only better. Dump the rest, as in the pretentious subjunctive and the cumbersome he or she construction to make subject-predicate agreement work. Scott G: Andy Wood: I get the gist of your post and mostly agree. If I had to choose one thing to judge the merits of a piece of writing, it is the quality of the content, not the grammar. If you use perfect English and your writing is repetitive, boring or borders on plagiarism, then correct verb-subject agreement means little to me. Other elements of communication are far more important. Are you all so picky about it? To think that two nations, over a period of more than years, would develop separations in their common language… unthinkable! We may have a lot of bad habits in this country, but I daresay that the English currently spoken in Great Britain is a far cry from the English that was spoken there years ago. In many dialects, it is already just about equivalent — regardless of how much it annoys you. Something else will take its place or has. Semantic shift happens in every living language. In the medical world, this is something that would require the use of suppositories. Anyone else bothered by this one? While I guess literally is used accurately in these cases, it just seems unnecessary most of the time. A worthy cause indeed for those writers who take pride in their craft to rise up and counter the onslaught of excuses for poor grammar—from just being conversational to Blackberry and text language. It has been said that education is expensive, but not as expensive as ignorance. With these writing habits becoming widely acceptable, what will be the cost? Funny, though, how some terms become used by the medical community and lose their other meanings. It has been relatively stable even since ancient Latin times. In all seriousness, this article was practical and I was able to put it to use immediately. A hundred times, thank you! Latest Post: I like what Johnny had wrote. Its literally earth shaking. We all gots things we could get improved on with grammar. By the way, for those taking notes, notice how much more attention this post gets from Johnny not trying to have the entire discussion in the post. Sure, some of these are subject to regional variation or can be argued for as common usage. Sonia — Exactly. I do not know everything. There are as many people vehemently fighting on one side of an issue as there are on the other. Chimps are funny. This post is currently the ninth most popular post on Copyblogger, ranking by number of comments and pingbacks. That makes me happy. Smitty wrote: If you have been given suppositories for your impacted wisdom tooth, you need to change your dentist. Funny, because it is improperly used so often. Subjects, verbs, nouns, reflexive, etc…. Thanks for the refresher. Great bit. That advice seems to help them break the habit! I hear it everywhere. Sometimes it makes me want to scream at the person talking. Come to Australia for a visit. Gimmier lickerish trap an some chicken-an look, fellers, no hens. The best thing is to have a sense of humour and thanks for some of the hilarious input. For all intensive purposes, I hardly never sound like a chimp. I prefer screeching hyena. These are great. The an historic one is pretty bad. Nice but you left our my most hated one. It makes me grind me teeth and want to punch the person who writes it. I do think myself has developed an emphatic role which I can sometimes tolerate, but most times it sounds stupid. This ship has sailed. Your best hope is to learn to love it. Try it out at least twice a day till it feels natural. Otherwise, you are doomed to fuddyduddyville. Absolutely right. And if literally loses its meaning how will we distinguish the real from the false? Other than common sense, I mean. I hate relying on that. Literally hate it. WTF is with that? Extremely helpful!!! I always make a mistake on that one. The word they with its counterparts them, their, and themselves as a singular pronoun to refer to a person of unspecified sex has been used since at least the 16th century. It makes it seem like I am bragging and is just filling up space with no need for it. Everyone began looking for their books at once. Such use is not a recent development, nor is it a mark of ignorance. Shakespeare, Swift, Shelley, Scott, and Dickens, as well as many other English and American writers, have used they and its forms to refer to singular antecedents. Already widespread in the language though still rejected as ungrammatical by some , this use of they, their, and them is increasing in all but the most conservatively edited American English. This increased use is at least partly impelled by the desire to avoid the sexist implications of he as a pronoun of general reference. Bock, my 5th grade English teacher for giving me the simplest of litmus tests. Parsons out of the sentence. When it doubt, the simplest way to figure out what to use is to leave the other folks out of the sentence. Then, of course, add them back in: Parsons and me. Great piece of writing. As you say, once or twice is acceptable, any more and my interest is lost. When interesting titles go bad. Article good. Misleading title that had nothing to do with the post bad. An historically bad title myself was not soon to forget. Nice article, and no argument with the grammar points. Although we may not like it, language changes. And there are always those that hate to let go. In the rule Was vs Were, what would be the case in the event it was used to describe an action of someone else, i. Please read: This made my day! Grammar nerdery is a wonderful thing. I have to stop following this thread, as it shows all signs of going on forever. But until then …. Pretty entertaining stuff! Thanks for this post, John! Very interesting article! Many people with native language different than english do common sense errors in their blogs instead promoting clean and crisp language…. There is literally a blog that tracks literally: This was driving me crazy the other day. Every source I checked seemed to have a different opinion. The sentence would still make sense without it and could be moved: Fly, be free. Worry about fluency. And if you already have it, then stop worrying about language and get on with it. Laroquod said at 6: Well, yes. But that means that 10 percent of your readers stop mid-sentence to think: He split an infinitive. To me, writing should be invisible. I am trying to communicate a very specific message, and anything that undermines my communication is defeating my object. So I try to avoid them. Just as I try to avoid showing off in a way that might impress and so interrupt the flow of another 10 percent. Of course, none of this works for a readership that comprises professional writers, because everyone in that group will scrutinize every word. No, Marc. I should have said that I recommend that good writers—like good chefs—should focus on their goals to turn on readers or diners rather than to show off too obviously their technical skills. Wow, you literally cut poeple up — including myself — chewed them, and and then spat them out! Truth is, I hate the man or woman who makes these mistakes, too. Are they an hillbilly or something? Just so everyone knows, this post has made me paranoid. See how flexible I am? It just drives me crazy literally! Chimps abound, apparently. Could it concern something other than simply just ignorance? That it shows up in writing demonstrates the way in which grammar is shaped. Oh Johnny… you had me. I was literally ha going to start telling all that would listen about your brilliance, your beauty surely all grammar snobs are beautiful , your… hmmm, what is the word? Your rightness. And then, much to my chagrin, you committed one of my own pet peeves in comment You cannot come up with a better choice of words? Just tell me that you spontaneously developed a 23rd chromosome and all will be right in the world. Would you like another example: Wait, wait, wait. Hold on. Sarah Turner I write both in French and in English, and, like Johnny B. There are writers who are as dangerous as bad drivers. But there is another side to that coin. I try to write as well as I know how. Which may be why I never try to humiliate anyone else when they do. The chances of my ever successfully constructing a bookcase are minimal. The chances of my ever returning a tennis serve are similar. Pointing and laughing are bad ways to foster talent. Those who are interested in writing will quickly discover the basic rules, and will — like the rest of us — embark on a lifetime of learning. Great post, One really easy tip to add to them is this: Make sure you check a post or comment before hitting the send button. I think we can finally consider that a correct meaning. Meanings change. But after a while even the most pedantic just have to let go. And I think nearly three centuries is long enough. You are not crazy. It sounds better. That is all it takes — how does it sound best. Of course, the words have to be pronounced correctly, something most Americans seem incapable of. This is how you would manage to read a history book to learn about an historical event, and be correct. It is a rather outdated rule that continues to change over time as we continue to pronounce things differently. Language shifts, but at this point in time, it is still acceptable. People will get angry at you for it, but people will always be there to defend you for it as well because technically both are correct. Give it another couple of decades, and it may be gone forever. Do you think this is an example of language constantly changing, which I suppose could reasonably be claimed given the number of times I hear it in a week? Or are they getting it wrong and therefore should be corrected? However, they are the source of language change and, when adopted by enough people especially people with power they are considered legitimate language changes. Can you tell me where this is? Should you correct them? At the very least, they should know the more standard meaning of the word lend. People should have access to that so that they can be best understood by others outside their immediate social groups, and also so that they have more opportunities for social advancement. But explain to them, too, that in school it has a different meaning and you want them to use that meaning for practice. Of course, whether your correcting has much effect is another matter entirely. Peers have more influence on our speech than teachers or even parents. Alistair Keep up the good work and continue correcting. I recently came to the conclusion that language is an evolving thing but there are some words, quite a lot of them, that are exempt from this theory. I agree, Christine. And that really makes me sad. Cassie How funny. A very good friend of mine, an English teacher, used to tell me that there was no such thing as correct spelling, for precisely the same reason — that language is constantly evolving. I told him this is completely ridiculous. I have also been told that as a Science teacher, I should ignore misspellings and grammatical errors as we should be focusing solely on the Science. However, my argument is that being able to communicate effectively is part of being a scientist, and if pupils are unable to do that then they are not being good scientists. The British Government had a great idea in the 60s; they decided the best way of teaching English was to encourage pupils to write phonetically. Unfortunately, it was much more difficult to read because of all of the possible phonetic variations and led, ultimately, to a generation that struggled — and still struggles — with literacy. However, we have to aim to uphold the standards so that people can communicate effectively. By the way, I have a feeling that the reference to chimps was probably made in humour and not intended to cause offence. They may sound very different to you, but to a complete outsider there will probably be far more similarities than differences. The fact that it is that widespread actually points to there being more going on than just a few ignorant kids. I'm not going to talk about the bone-deep exhaustion that comes from being onstage all day, or the drowning sensation that follows you home on nights and weekends when you have hundreds of papers to grade. These are the other things -- the stuff you might only understand if you have a key to the teachers' lounge. A friend once told me, "You have no idea what it's like to have a real job -- something with deadlines and adults breathing down your neck. You get to be your own boss. When we close our door each day and stride to the front of the classroom, it's easy to fall prey to the illusion that we are in charge. It's your name on that door, after all, so you must be the boss. Parents are the boss of you. The administration is the boss of you. Common Core is the boss of you. The students can sense it, which occasionally leads to comments like, "My parents pay your salary, you know. And because of that truth, there is often immense pressure to compromise your integrity: Despite my aforementioned friend's ignorance, I'll give her this: Pee 2. Get coffee 3. Spend fifteen minutes chatting leisurely with a colleague 4. Go out to lunch 5. Complete paperwork and other job-related tasks during the actual work day 6. Sit down occasionally. I'm pretty sure the real reason summer break exists is because the School Gods counted up all the seconds you don't get to use the bathroom and handed them back to you in one big chunk. Twenty-five-minute lunches are not conducive to nice, relaxing meals beyond the building's walls, and you can only relieve yourself during passing time -- which, unfortunately, is the only opportunity all the OTHER teachers have to take care of business. Adding to the sting of your not-in-charge-ness, many people who ARE in charge have literally never taught a day in their lives -- and a lot of them are pretty sure they know how to do it better than you. Most people have lights in their home, but that doesn't make them electricians. My husband doesn't know how to manage a restaurant just because we've gone out to eat. SVU once a week? Surely, teaching is different, though, right? At some point, just about everyone has sat in a classroom. We were all students, after all. Six, seven, eight hours a day, ever since preschool, everyone has seen this job, so everyone is allowed to have an opinion. But even brand new teachers can tell: So when your high, high, highest-ups are committees of people who only know what it's like to be a student, it feels akin to a team of accountants trying to wire a building. For a while now, teachers have been battling an increasing pressure to "teach to the test. Art and music programs are still in grave danger -- and, in some districts , have already been slashed to ribbons. An elementary school teacher I know -- who is a part of one of the wealthiest, most reputable districts in her state -- attended a recent meeting where staff members were instructed to "drastically limit or entirely eliminate" story time. They deserve to gather around a rocking chair and feed their imaginations. They deserve the magic of a captivating story. English teachers look on helplessly as more and more works of fiction are plucked from the curriculum and replaced by fact-driven nonfiction. Even though we're sometimes invited to join curriculum committees as I did under the guise that we might have a say, it's ultimately just a ruse: But here's the thing: Our beloved works of fiction aren't just getting elbowed aside by facts and figures. They're also being trounced by the frenetic crush of technology. There's an app -- er, a reason -- for that. This one is tricky. But I might argue that our job is also to challenge our students with something new -- and, to this generation, technology is not new. In fact, it is all they know. Our kids don't need more of it -- most of them have been swiping and zooming and smartphone-ing since they were toddlers -- and they continue to do it right in the middle of your probably fact-driven lecture about some probably nonfiction book, by the way. It's incredibly frustrating when all that glorious innovation serves as more of a distraction than a learning tool. Though we teachers tend to stick together, I also have a group of friends and family with a wide range of careers -- they run the gamut from successful marketers to mechanical engineers to human resource managers. All of them have interviewed prospective employees for over a decade, and all of them now have a similar complaint: The three C's people suddenly seem to be missing? Curiosity, creativity, and communication skills. Technology is wonderful -- nay, necessary -- for a plethora of things, but it's killing those beautiful C's. And as a teacher, you don't just witness the death, you are expected to assist in the murder. Because of standardized expectations, you must incorporate more and more tech, even when all you want to do is take a hammer to anything with a screen. The air inside your classroom walls is probably thick with the stench of "It's not my fault, it's your fault," and it sure seems like the smell is coming from the students. Like cigarette smoke, it gets carried in from home, rising from their backpacks, woven through the threads of their clothes and the fibers of their upbringing. Their whole lives, generations of special snowflakes have received copious awards and accolades just for playing -- NOT for excelling -- so it's no wonder kids have come to expect an A "because I tried. It means that Johnny might have actually earned a D this time. Teaching is a highly introspective career by nature and I am going to ask you to look deeply at yourself to determine if this is the right career you. Let me start you off with a little statistic, according to the New Teacher Center NTC , a nonprofit organization that helps create training for new educators, between 40 and 50 percent of new teachers quit within five years. Whatever their circumstances, I want to make sure this doesn't happen to you because you weren't reflective enough, or because you didn't understand the basics of the job. Let's focus on six fundamental questions. What are the fundamental questions one should ask themselves before entering the teaching profession? First, do I really like being around kids all day? Why do I enjoy spending time around kids? Is there a particular age group I prefer more than others? If you aren't able to answer this question with a resounding yes, then follow with a good explanation of why you enjoy working with kids, then it probably isn't the job for you. If you say yes to the first question but can't think of a time when you actually worked with kids, and by "worked with" I mean you tried to help them with something that they struggled with. Perhaps you taught a kid to ride a bike and it brought you joy or frustration, how about teaching a teenager to drive? Maybe you have done some coaching in sports. Many young people tend to want to be teachers because they enjoyed school so much. However, they rarely encountered classroom management issues as a student because they were usually in Honors or AP classes, where classroom management is usually not a problem. So when they enter their own non-honors or non-AP classroom to teach for the first time, they have no experience or even a point of reference on how to deal with behavior and discipline issues. This culture shock sometimes sends them running out of the teaching profession. If you have no experiences working with kids at all but just "feel" like you would enjoy it, here is my suggestion. Volunteer to tutor somewhere, monitor how you feel while doing it. If you skip this step you will have NO basis to answer this question and it is perhaps the most fundamental question you need to answer. This is tough to answer because we all like to think we are dependable and we get things done. This is where you need to be truly honest with yourself, are you the person that your friends KNOW they can count on? Ask them to be brutally honest with you. Perhaps more importantly do you always follow though what you start? Did you follow through on that New Year's resolution last year? The reason this is so important is because as a teacher YOU have to be the rock, the person that can always be counted on and the person who always backs up what they say they are going to do. Without this fundamental quality no one will respect you, most of all your students and that is the best way to hate your job and your life for about years before you quit. Do you genuinely have a passion for an academic subject? If so which one and can you think of why that matters so much to you? Kids come first, content comes second..

It is showing teenagers how to debate thoughtfully, how go here think critically, how to disagree respectfully. It is hearing from students ten years after graduation, Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? they just thought you should know it was your Spanish class that made them want to study abroad, your passion for science that led to a major in biochemistry, your quiet Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

during their dark days that convinced them to keep coming to school in the first place. Where does that fall on the "highly effective" checklist?

How can you document that Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? of delayed impact? It certainly can't be measured by A's and E's, or even by weekly walk-throughs. It's no wonder you're getting frustrated. But if these are the reasons you might leave, here is the reason you might stay: The kids. After a year without them, you Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

miss their unbridled school Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? during Homecoming Week, their contagious sense of humor, the way they draw pictures for you and wave joyous hellos in the hallways.

You might miss their ability to make you forget about the rough start to your morning, or the looks of awe on their captivated faces when they finally learn something that matters. If it weren't for them, instead of Googling "I don't want to teach anymore," you might already be gone. A version of this post first appeared on Michifornia Girl.

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. Teacher with papers. To acknowledge the occasion, let me share with you the top search -- BY FAR -- that brings people to my site: I don't want to teach anymore. You are an "authority figure" with no real authority. Reality check: Your day does not resemble that of a typical white-collar professional.

Here are the things your friends can do at work: Because you know what else is the boss of you? The bell schedule. Everyone thinks they know how to do your job. You know read more probably going to happen? That sucker's going up in flames.

You wanted to foster imagination, not slaughter it. That doesn't leave very much room for make-believe. All the entitlement and the trophies and the apathy and whatever. Ironically, this is not their Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?. I hope I will be that kind of parent. They'll know we are on the same team.

Is Teaching the Right Career for You? (6 Questions to Ask Yourself)

If you're a teacher worth your salt, this might be the most Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? of the bunch. It's no wonder you don't want to do this anymore. Real Life. Real News. Real Voices. Help us check this out more of the stories that matter from voices that too often remain unheard. Canada U. US News. World News.

Social Justice. Donald Trump. Queer Voices. Black Voices. Latino Voices. Raihan Khalaf. If you obsess over every grammatical and structural point, you can visit web page across as stiff. You make one mistake and a lot of Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? will let it go. Copyblogger has covered grammar nicely here and here and here. But I, as a newcomer to these parts, have a few more peeves to add to the pot.

Ignore them at your peril, Bubbles. This is one that people make because they think that complicating the language needlessly will make them sound smart. This is extremely common, and I can almost forgive it because the correct structure is cumbersome.

A good compromise is to pick a gender and run with it. The standard used to be to assume any unknown person was a man e. This tends to make things more obvious. But you should also fix it. Now, think about that for a second.

Seriously, trust me on this one. What, have you forgotten already? Click here to learn more about Grammarly, a tool for serious writers. Johnny B. Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? is the author of How To Be Legendary: Another great piece Johnny. That silent H is responsible for more than one bloodbath.

I have to admit that whenever I write or speak, I do focus much more on the content or the idea and less on the grammar. This is a nice article to start thinking about my language mistakes, thank you. I guess a lot of people will be double checking their comments before pressing the submit button.

I have a question though regarding point 3. Thank Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? I literally explode when people use literally for Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? everything. It literally drives me insane. Literally, I am in a padded room right now. Johnny- Nice work, very practical. Many publishing outlets are time sensitive, and getting something out first can make all the difference.

I love grammar lessons! I realize that this is Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? for emphasis, yet people use it to sound poetic, sophisticated. I parsed sentences as a little girl for fun, so Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? was a treat, literally, like. And how does it make its way into books so often? I only learned that word when studying French grammar. It seems to be a case very few English-speaking people know of. You explain with great clarity. That just sounds weird.

Could it be something that is influenced by regional pronunciations? Nice Bubbles reference. It was hilarious in a good way. He or she is extremely clunky, and many people get really weird about the sexist implications of hypothetical situations they should get Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? it. Any thoughts? Using adjectives instead of adverbs is an all-too common error. How much leeway should writers have for dramatic effect? Some acronyms are pronounced as a word, though. Oakland as what?

I also think that blogging in particular is a forgiving medium and can be more casual. I just did it in the above paragraph. Brian made this point in one of those articles I linked to… the first, I think. It sounds weird to me, but so do a lot of these the first time I hear them. At John Truant and Phil: After an adjective we use adverbs with a few exceptions some of which are the verb to be, get, feel etc.

If the sentence were ha! Would you say:. It, along with canned laughter, should die. Good post. Thanks for the tips. Marc — I actually had a bit in here about that but removed it because it was going off topic.

You might want to chalk it up to regional pronunciations.

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My Texan grandparents did that a lot. If badly modifies feel then it seems to imply you have problems emoting. And regardless of strict correctness which is sometimes very often in the eye of the beholderusage generally wins out in the end. That said, generally speaking, here in the US people generally seem use adjectives instead of adverbs. I Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? well means I have a good sniffer. Preach it!

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Click to see more lord, those last two lines sound insane when I read them back in my head.

I noun became verb crazy object. I am fishing. I will be fishing. Marc, not correct. Great post. Thank you for pointing out the subtlety of using articles. Another easy way to improve grammar naturally is to read classic literature or just books in general. The more Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

read a certain language being used correctly, the more likely you will use it correctly as well. At least, this is my experience. Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? forgot to mention one of the biggest abuses: But when I write for one magazine client in particular, they always change that to the following on editing:. I try to avoid it or alternate. Interestingly, I was reading the blogs of several noted professional copyeditors earlier this week, and two items struck me:.

Keep in mind, language at least, English is a living language, and to try to proscribe any changes is a losing proposition. Phil — I set a trap Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? anyone who disagreed with me. It just feels sloppy to me.

An Historical post! I were going to write about this, but you literally took it right out from under me! So now Tom, Darren, and myself will have to come up Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? something totally better! Lack of the serial comma makes me nuts in AP style. Like you, I much prefer it for clarity.

Muncrat Porn Watch Video Sexcontact tumblr. Good lord, those last two lines sound insane when I read them back in my head. I noun became verb crazy object. I am fishing. I will be fishing. Marc, not correct. Great post. Thank you for pointing out the subtlety of using articles. Another easy way to improve grammar naturally is to read classic literature or just books in general. The more you read a certain language being used correctly, the more likely you will use it correctly as well. At least, this is my experience. You forgot to mention one of the biggest abuses: But when I write for one magazine client in particular, they always change that to the following on editing:. I try to avoid it or alternate. Interestingly, I was reading the blogs of several noted professional copyeditors earlier this week, and two items struck me:. Keep in mind, language at least, English is a living language, and to try to proscribe any changes is a losing proposition. Phil — I set a trap for anyone who disagreed with me. It just feels sloppy to me. An Historical post! I were going to write about this, but you literally took it right out from under me! So now Tom, Darren, and myself will have to come up with something totally better! Lack of the serial comma makes me nuts in AP style. Like you, I much prefer it for clarity. It drives me crazy to see bad grammar in blogs — I know I do it too, but it still drives me nuts! Marc — You guys put mayonnaise on French fries. Alice — Read this: Case in point: Now THAT makes you sound like a chimp! In that way they would understand how so many of us are offended when writers use adjectives instead of adverbs. Very well done. Everyone needs this. I am not a huge stickler for grammar but reading poor grammar reduces the impact of any article. I think I will have…chocolate ice cream! For example, correct use of commas around clauses always results in the comma-surrounded clause being able to be removed from the sentence with the sentence still having valid structure. Check out this one…. It is a preposition! Its only for loosers. Johnny- Hooray! For years, I learned that you keep it, until I got to college and took a bunch of journalism classes. It most certainly is the AP that marks out the final comma of a list, but only in certain situations. Those poor punctuation marks are so abused. I got so sick of seeing people use apostrophes to make words plural that I finally wrote a post about it: Michelle — http: We should get together and talk about that mad affiliate cash you just sent me. Thank you, thank you, thank you! Or at least, sigh loudly. He makes a good point. I love it when you figure out that something is correct, and so you use it correctly. I hate that. Very useful article. I share your thoughts on literally. The word is getting rapped in The Netherlands as well. I probably do a Britney myself now and then. Everyone needs to have these rules burned into their brains. I recently saw a preview of a new gardening magazine. It had beautiful images, creative layout and fonts, and mistakes. Score one for everyone who actually notices these things. This article was great. Enjoy, and please me any really egregious ones you guys see! I did Johnny. You could have tied your old picture in with a new one for this article ; a picture with you and your twitter nuts running from the hall monitor. Most everyone realizes their mistake and we have a good laugh. Is perfectly ok to write. I love being a grammar nitpicker, but I also love breaking the rules for the sake of vernacular style. You might consider not being an annoying spoilsport. Paul oratorio. Not sure why. One more for your list: Obviously, if you could care less, then you care. Very elegantly done. As one poster noted, 2 about the plural they is incorrect. I have been hearing this quite a bit lately. Regarding 2: This is also on our list of most common grammatical errors. Our advice to clients and students is as follows: In English, there are some situations where the a very strict interpretation of the rules results in MORE confusion, not less. Copyblogger covered some situations a while back where you can and should bend the rules, because the confusion it would otherwise cause is greater. Their examples, with which I agree completely, are:. Anyway — thanks for the grammar talk. You can always count on your grammar geeks to jump in on something like this, J. Two strippers were all over ME. You can never say two strippers were all over I; thus you can never say two strippers were all over Jim and I. It would be: I, myself, believe that if I were to spend an hour or two thinking of all the grammatical pet peeves that I have, the list would be practically endless. Your comparisons with monosyllabic words are irrelevant. Wells F. Scott Fitzgerald Edith Wharton W. Auden George Orwell C. Ken, I disagree on the milk. It comes in half-gallon containers. I came here to say exactly what Laroquod and others said. English is a constantly evolving language. The rules do change over time. Oh, and thank you Russ for the note about unaccented first syllables. Just saying. Nothing will kill your copy quicker than trying to always follow the rules here. The problem with these sorts of rules is that almost none of us is capable of writing perfectly all the time. But too many people are language snobs who dredge up the same few rules too many of which are based on an extremely shaky understanding of the language to look down their noses at others. Your five explanations were great. However, I like to think of myself as more of an orangutan than a chimp. Umm, what? We mean men and women. Using the man as the universal gender produces shorter sentences and maintains historical continuity. I hope they are friendly. Historical continuity is important on many levels, let us not forget. May I ask what your statement is based on? Is this something you believe to have encountered, or something you read was true? Just curious. Sometimes I Think. Are you sure you want to agree with the language geeks at the NYTimes who posted this recent On Language column? Others have pointed out that lots of people use they I use it myself, but this is definitive evidence that your point 2 is actually wrong. DISagree, not agree. Edit my comment if you like, post this one as well, whichever you prefer. I see some previous comment posters made that same mistake. I agree that each of these points are irritating. I get so annoyed with people that my blood pressure rises! Rule of thumb: But still. Awesome post, Johnny. Notice how the meaning of the statement changes with each relocation of the word. Now he knows it bothers me so much, he does it just to play up. All are absolutely correct of course, excepting the last one. Whilst you are technically correct, it is extremely pedantic! Too further correct you, practically would have the same implication in the stated sentence if one follows the same pedantic rules. Thank you for reviewing these common grammar mistakes. Now someone will come around and offer to help me evolve. Ok, to review…. I live and work at home, so, if I were at work, I would also be was at work. Does that work? I blog in English, which is my second language, and have a fear of making stupid mistakes which I never make in my first language. Any tips and wisdom, like in this post, helps. John, Jim, Jack and Jill were suppose to get equal shares of an estate. And yet this article — like so many articles on prescriptivist grammar — sounds like it was written by someone with a very poor understanding of linguistics and not a very good understanding of grammar, either. Language change. Marking for the subjunctive has been on the way out for some time. I myself think you the author literally knew what they was doing when they wrote such An historic article about grammar. Wow, Brian, you caught a typo! You can pat yourself on the back now! Haha, yes to all of the above…yes to them making you sound like a chimp, not to actually committing these grammar violations. Somehow people think they are interchangeable when one is a comparison and one references the passing of time. That one drives me bananas. Are you Meg? Sorry to break the news. Let the language grow! In other words, there should be no ambiguity. Too often, lack of thought about even small issues can result in clouded meanings and ambiguity. One other strange thing … most of the things that make me seethe when the language gets mangled like this are things that I can work out in much the same way that as they are in the examples given here. Sorry, I thought this was a comment box, not a canvas. I left my oil paints at home. But no worries! But yes, that was me, Meg who lists no website, but mostly because I was being lazy tonight, as well as perhaps uncharacteristically sarcastic. What can I say, prescriptivism makes me cranky. Still… sore spot. I was not looking for typos in this article. You said cawtcha instead of caught you! I really enjoyed reading this article. Glad I know better! I can think of a lot more, including commonly misspelled words, so you may have just inspired me to write my own blog post on the fine arts of a grammar freak. Great job! Diane http: Parsons, and myself. Uh uh…. I forgot how much fun this could be. But, the discussions above about sometimes yes, sometimes no make the most sense. I tell graduate students now that that last comma is a matter of taste, but I still use it. What gets me riled up is: Nobody is perfect. Might try taking your own advice, Diane! Grammar posts are comment magnets every time. Either will distract the reader and muddy your efforts to clearly communicate your ideas. If I were — something that is never going to happen. If I was — something that could happen. For example:. Great piece. One that always trips me up is the use of adverbs. Probably yes, but it can lead to some cumbersome sentences. Regardless, good to see there are at least others on this blog who also suffer a language pedantry affliction. Will we ever recover? I just did a little research, which I should have done before asking my question! I checked out a few sites, here is one of the references I used: I found this stated in several websites. In there was a push for gender neutral pronouns worldwide, not just in America and the other countries mentioned above. Then in the 19th Century the tide turned again. It was started by a feministed school teacher. Sometimes a gender is evident and then the appropriate pronoun is used. I wanted to make a few points. So you can understand, most likely, why people are still using it at the present, even though it is considered incorrect by many grammarians. Finally, I wanted to say that finding a good solution for a universal pronoun is difficult for many. I find the invented pronouns just plain goofy! Take the article with a grain of salt. The only rule is that the rules will change over time… so to speak. This is but a snapshot of a language in motion, and with English spoken all over the world, cannot be accurate in every context. We no longer use the same English language that we used in the 10th century, or the 16th century. If someone is obsessive over using perfectly correct grammar, it could actually HINDER them from communicating effectively. Still, it never ceases to amaze me how popular these grammar discussions are. Reading the comments here has led me to ask about one other aggravation though this comes from my punctuation wench, not from from grammar wench , and it is this: What is that about? This distresses me. Cheers, all! Whilst in confession mode, I also split my infinitives if I think it makes a sentence read better and I regularly abuse dashes and points of elipsis. Why do English teachers in school find it very difficult to teach the subjunctive mood of the verb to their students? Yet you explained it very well and made it so easy to understand! Great write-up! I, too, am obsessed in finding grammatical errors on blogs though, of course, at times, I make mistakes, too. Gives me the shivers just writing it. Well, I must admit I am a little nervous to leave a comment that will be full of bad grammar and punctuation. Some bloggers insist that grammar is not that important, but that a little bad grammar shows their personality. So, good for you! By the way, one of my weaknesses is using commas everywhere and way too much…maybe you can do an article on punctuation next time! Like other parts of language, punctuation is also subject to change. I particularly like the interrobang. At last. I now feel free to move forward with my life. The relevant grammar rule is that a pronoun should agree in number with its antecedent. Why am I still reading this blog I ask myself. I should be asleep. Please stop posting — I need to be up in four hours …. Myself is going to the mall. Sam and I are going to the mall. I am going to the mall. I literally love this! Great visuals! I then blame in on my journalism degree and the faculty supervisor that ripped my writing to shreds when I wrote for the Oklahoma Daily many years ago. A couple of other pet peeves come to mind: Unique means one of a kind. Feel free us use that sentence in any post about overused metaphors. Thanks, Jan. Good points. It is evolving constantly and things that were not okay a long time ago, seem to be acceptable now. My partners English is not good, but my maths are lousy and he is a whiz on that score. Six, seven, eight hours a day, ever since preschool, everyone has seen this job, so everyone is allowed to have an opinion. But even brand new teachers can tell: So when your high, high, highest-ups are committees of people who only know what it's like to be a student, it feels akin to a team of accountants trying to wire a building. For a while now, teachers have been battling an increasing pressure to "teach to the test. Art and music programs are still in grave danger -- and, in some districts , have already been slashed to ribbons. An elementary school teacher I know -- who is a part of one of the wealthiest, most reputable districts in her state -- attended a recent meeting where staff members were instructed to "drastically limit or entirely eliminate" story time. They deserve to gather around a rocking chair and feed their imaginations. They deserve the magic of a captivating story. English teachers look on helplessly as more and more works of fiction are plucked from the curriculum and replaced by fact-driven nonfiction. Even though we're sometimes invited to join curriculum committees as I did under the guise that we might have a say, it's ultimately just a ruse: But here's the thing: Our beloved works of fiction aren't just getting elbowed aside by facts and figures. They're also being trounced by the frenetic crush of technology. There's an app -- er, a reason -- for that. This one is tricky. But I might argue that our job is also to challenge our students with something new -- and, to this generation, technology is not new. In fact, it is all they know. Our kids don't need more of it -- most of them have been swiping and zooming and smartphone-ing since they were toddlers -- and they continue to do it right in the middle of your probably fact-driven lecture about some probably nonfiction book, by the way. It's incredibly frustrating when all that glorious innovation serves as more of a distraction than a learning tool. Though we teachers tend to stick together, I also have a group of friends and family with a wide range of careers -- they run the gamut from successful marketers to mechanical engineers to human resource managers. All of them have interviewed prospective employees for over a decade, and all of them now have a similar complaint: The three C's people suddenly seem to be missing? Curiosity, creativity, and communication skills. Technology is wonderful -- nay, necessary -- for a plethora of things, but it's killing those beautiful C's. And as a teacher, you don't just witness the death, you are expected to assist in the murder. Because of standardized expectations, you must incorporate more and more tech, even when all you want to do is take a hammer to anything with a screen. The air inside your classroom walls is probably thick with the stench of "It's not my fault, it's your fault," and it sure seems like the smell is coming from the students. Like cigarette smoke, it gets carried in from home, rising from their backpacks, woven through the threads of their clothes and the fibers of their upbringing. Their whole lives, generations of special snowflakes have received copious awards and accolades just for playing -- NOT for excelling -- so it's no wonder kids have come to expect an A "because I tried. It means that Johnny might have actually earned a D this time. It means he might not have written a perfect paper. Brace yourself for the irate phone call in the morning. Of course, for every helicopter parent, there is a devastatingly absentee parent, as well as an equal number who are so remarkably supportive that you wonder if they're even real. They are warm and generous and responsible. I became a mother a few years ago, and I must shamefully admit I get it now. My children ARE special. My children DO try. I do not EVER want them to feel like they are anything less than the most important people in the world. When my daughter's preschool note tells me she was not a good listener that day, I feel frustrated and helpless and a little bit sure the teacher is just being too demanding. When she ran her first Toddler Turkey Trot last November, the people in charge asked if I wanted to buy her a medal. But as a teacher, this is what you wish you could say: Stop making excuses for your kids. Teach them to earn things, not demand things. Hold them to a higher standard. Challenge them. That way, when I try to challenge them, they'll know we both expect it. Left to their own devices, the kids will be the first to tell you: Yeah, I totally forgot about that assignment. I didn't really try my best. I just didn't feel like finishing the reading. Whoops -- sorry, Ms. They'll cringe at you with raised eyebrows and endearing self-awareness. They'll laugh uproariously when you pull a pretend trophy from your desk and give it a quick shine as soon as they catch themselves in the act of whining. They know. Deep down, despite that wafting air of entitlement, they know exactly what's going on. They are smarter than that, and they are capable of more failures -- and consequently, more successes -- than the world is allowing them to experience. In order for people to really know how well you're doing your job, they have to watch you do it. If you say yes to the first question but can't think of a time when you actually worked with kids, and by "worked with" I mean you tried to help them with something that they struggled with. Perhaps you taught a kid to ride a bike and it brought you joy or frustration, how about teaching a teenager to drive? Maybe you have done some coaching in sports. Many young people tend to want to be teachers because they enjoyed school so much. However, they rarely encountered classroom management issues as a student because they were usually in Honors or AP classes, where classroom management is usually not a problem. So when they enter their own non-honors or non-AP classroom to teach for the first time, they have no experience or even a point of reference on how to deal with behavior and discipline issues. This culture shock sometimes sends them running out of the teaching profession. If you have no experiences working with kids at all but just "feel" like you would enjoy it, here is my suggestion. Volunteer to tutor somewhere, monitor how you feel while doing it. If you skip this step you will have NO basis to answer this question and it is perhaps the most fundamental question you need to answer. This is tough to answer because we all like to think we are dependable and we get things done. This is where you need to be truly honest with yourself, are you the person that your friends KNOW they can count on? Ask them to be brutally honest with you. Perhaps more importantly do you always follow though what you start? Did you follow through on that New Year's resolution last year? The reason this is so important is because as a teacher YOU have to be the rock, the person that can always be counted on and the person who always backs up what they say they are going to do. Without this fundamental quality no one will respect you, most of all your students and that is the best way to hate your job and your life for about years before you quit. Do you genuinely have a passion for an academic subject? If so which one and can you think of why that matters so much to you? Kids come first, content comes second. Loving what you teach isn't nearly as important as loving who you teach. However, if you are going to spend a lengthy career doing this you better love math, or science, or art or whatever the academic subject is. If you don't have a genuine passion for the subject then you will fail to convey that passion to students and they will fail to see its importance to their lives. If you are a real science nerd then what makes you so passionate about it and WHY is it so important that future generations know this stuff? Is working with kids and talking about a subject you like all day worth four years of university study and tuition , long hours of tedious work, low pay, and little recognition to you? You have to really care about education, there are very few teachers out there in which, to them, teaching is just a job. That's because the level of commitment the job requires goes beyond most typical jobs. Teaching is more of a lifestyle where personal sacrifice is an understood norm. Are you the type that likes to leave work at work?.

Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? drives me crazy to see bad grammar in blogs — I know I do it too, but Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U? still drives me nuts! Marc — You guys put mayonnaise on French fries. Alice — Read this: Case in point: Now THAT makes you sound like a chimp! In that way they would understand how so many of us are offended when writers use adjectives instead of adverbs. Very well done. Everyone needs this. I am not a huge stickler for grammar but reading poor grammar reduces the impact of any article.

7 Reasons You Might Not Want to Teach Anymore

I think I will have…chocolate ice cream! For example, correct use of commas around clauses always results in the comma-surrounded clause being able to be removed from the sentence with Teacher Ure Enjoying This Arent U?

sentence still having valid structure. Check out this one…. It is a preposition! Melissa rycroft nude pics.

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